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In the following code that I tried to compile:

List<Animal> animals;
List<? extends Animal> some;
animals = some;

I got the following error:

Type mismatch: cannot convert from List<capture#2-of ? extends Animal> to List<Animal>

But a list containing <? extends Animal> is guaranteed to contain at least Animal type in it, so why this error? Is this because if it's allowed, I can then put any random subclass object of Animal into 'animals' list, or is it something else?

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List<? extends Animal> means it is a list of some unknown type that is either Animal or a subclass of Animal. List<Animal> can accept any Animal, but List<Lion> (which is safely converted treated as List<? extends Animal>) obviously cannot. Hopefully you understand :-) –  oldrinb Aug 17 '12 at 7:30
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See my comment.

List<? extends Animal> means it is a list of some unknown type that is either Animal or a subclass of Animal. List<Animal> can accept any Animal, but List<Lion> (which is safely treated as List<? extends Animal>) obviously cannot.

This is a classic example of upper-bounded wildcards. Make sure you read the Java Tutorial.


In the case you merely want a List<Animal> containing all of the elements of your List<? extends Animal>, you can merely do...

final List<? extends Animal> someAnimals = ...;
final List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<Animal>(someAnimals);

This takes advantage of the fact that ArrayList has a constructor which takes Collection<? extends E>.

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List<? extends Animal> means that the list contains all instances of an unknown subtype of Animal, e.g. List<Cat>, List<Dog> and so on.

List<Animal> instead could might contain both Cat, Dog instances, therefore the cast is not legal.

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Because List<? extends Animal> is not a subtype of List<Animal>. If your assignment was legal than you could add a Dog object to a list of Cat. Like this:

List<Animal> cats = new List<Animal>();
cats.add(new Cat());
List<Dog> dogs = cats; //if was legal
dogs.add(new Dog)); //now you have a dog in a list of cats

Beware of arrays! With arrays the assignment is legal and the problem is not caught at compile time but at run time. For example:

Animal[] cats = new Animal[] {...};
Dogs[] dogs = cats; // OK at compile time
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