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I want to extract the data from SUB tag line by line and store the data in hash.. I did this but im not getting the result

==file==

<SUB>
 name1="abc"
 value1="24"
 value2="24"
</SUB>

<SUB>
 name="abc2"
</SUB>

<SUB>
 name3="ag"
 value3="27"
</SUB>

<SUB>
 name4="ljh"
 value4="90"
</SUB>

===code===

use strict;
 use warnings; 
 open my $fh, '<', 'data_file.txt' or die $!;  

 while (<$fh>) {
    while(m{<SUB>(.*?)<\/SUB>}g){
    print $2,"|";
    }
 }

plz help me out...

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3 Answers

This should do it:

use strict;
use warnings;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    if ($line =~ /<SUB>/ .. $line =~ /<\/SUB>/){
        if ( $line =~ /(\S+?)="([^"]+)"/ ) {
            print $1 . " = " . $2 . "\n";
        }
    }
}

__DATA__
<SUB>
 name1="abc"
 value1="24"
 value2="24"
</SUB>

<SUB>
 name="abc2"
</SUB>

<SUB>
 name3="ag"
 value3="27"
</SUB>

<SUB>
 name4="ljh"
 value4="90"
</SUB>

If you have trouble understanding my code, just ask.

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thanks.. this is working but i want this in another format.. i want to store the each sub tag data in hash set... so i can get the values through key... –  Dixit Wadhwani Aug 17 '12 at 8:18
1  
To store the results in a hash, just replace this line: print $1 . " = " . $2 . "\n"; with $hash{$1} = $2;. Of course, you should declare my %hash; before the loop (Note: this assumes that each tag is unique in the file. If you have repeated tags and need to keep both values, you would need a more complex data structure). –  dan1111 Aug 17 '12 at 8:47
1  
So instead of printing $1 and $2 you just make a new entry in a hash like this $foo{$1} = $2. Remember to declare the hash outside the while loop to it is visible/accessible outside of it. Also remember that you could overwrite existing entries in the hash with this method if you have multiple entries with the same key in your file. You can check if a hash key already exists with the aptly named function exists(). –  tauli Aug 17 '12 at 8:49
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{
local $/;
#slurp mode read whole file in
<>;
print join "|", m{<SUB>(.*?)<\/SUB>}sg;
}

1) you need read the whole file, not line by line 2) add /s so Dot (.) matches newline.

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The while (<$fh>) construct only reads on line at a time… And you use the capture buffer 2 with $2 when only one capture group exists… Didn't you get warnings about an undefined variable $2 in string or concatenation?

There are several solutions to this:

  1. Read the whole file into a single string:

    my $fileContents = do {
       local $/ = undef; # input line seperator, undef means "slurp"
       join "", <$fh>;
    };
    while(/(...)/g) {...}
    
  2. Use the flip-flop (..) operator do determine if we are inside a tag. Only works as wanted when each tags occupies a line on it's own. See @taulis excellent answer for code.

  3. Extra nifty: Set the input seperator to the closing tag: Each time you do a line read, you read until the closing tag is encountered (included).

    local $/ = "\n</SUB>\n";
    while (my $entry = <$fh>) {
         # only keep what's inside the tag
         $line =~ s{ <SUB> \s* (.*?) \s* </SUB> $}{$1}sx;
         # do further processing like printing
    }
    
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