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I have two different result from exchanging two lines of code ( done = true with Console.Write() one )

If I put done = true, firstly, the result will be: True

Else If I put Console.WriteLine() firstly, the result will be: False False

Why? ( see carefully, that bool variable is static! )

using System;
using System.Threading;

class Program
{
    static bool done;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        new Thread(test).Start();
        test();
    }

    static void test()
    {
        if (!done)
        {
            done = true;
            Console.WriteLine(done);
        }
    }
}
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1  
bool is not tread safe –  Eric Yin Aug 17 '12 at 8:14
9  
You may be even more surprised to occasionally (but probably extremely rarely) see "True True" printed with the posted code. –  Michael Burr Aug 17 '12 at 8:24
1  
Incredible naivety, even didn't try to read any theory on thread safety issue in C#...and what locks, monitors, semaphors, mutexes, etc have been invented for... –  horgh Aug 17 '12 at 14:48
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4 Answers

My bet is that the Console.WriteLine will be enough work to keep the thread busy while the second call to test() has a chance to execute.

So basically the call to WriteLine delays the setting of done long enough for the second call to test to be able to test done and find it is still set as false.

If you leave it as shown, with done = true; before the write to the console then this will be set almost instantly and thus the second call to test will find done set to true and will therefore not perform the Console.WriteLine.

Hope that all makes sense.


I just found this which contains code very much like your question. If you didn't get your question from this page already, then I would suggest having a read as it explains in much more detail the cause of this effect.

With the follow key extract:

On a single-processor computer, a thread scheduler performs time-slicing — rapidly switching execution between each of the active threads. Under Windows, a time-slice is typically in the tens-of-milliseconds region — much larger than the CPU overhead in actually switching context between one thread and another (which is typically in the few-microseconds region).

So essentially the call to Console.WriteLine is taking long enough for the processor to decide that it is time for the main thread to have another go before your extra thread is permitted to continue (and ultimate set the done flag)

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3  
+1, also note that the static keyword emphasised in the OP does in no way mean its all thread safe. –  Filip Aug 17 '12 at 8:25
2  
It makes perfect sense - the Console.WriteLine call is the only substantive operation in the app and would require a lock to be taken on the output buffer. –  Martin James Aug 17 '12 at 8:28
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Your code isn't thread safe, and the results will be unpredictable.

You need to lock access when reading / writing to the static boolean, like so:

    static bool done;
    static readonly object _mylock = new object();
    static void Main()
    {
        //Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        //Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
        //Application.Run(new Form1());
        new Thread(test).Start();
        test();
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static void test()
    {
        lock (_mylock)
        {
            if (!done)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(done);
                done = true;
            }
        }
    }

Edit : readonly thanks @d4wn

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2  
Would be even better if you make myLock readonly. –  Şafak Gür Aug 17 '12 at 8:25
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Looks like the scheduler just cut the CPU time from one thread after it's call of Console.Writeline and then gave it to the other thread, all before done was set to true.

Are you certain that it always prints False\nFalse when you call Console.Writeline before assigning done = true;? To my understanding, this should be quite random.

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I'm testing now on my PC this code, while it prints ( if Console.WriteLine(done) - is first, then setting bool variable to the "true" ) –  user1565077 Aug 17 '12 at 8:28
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Each time a shared variable is accessed by one of the sharing threads must be protected by one of the syncronization techniques explicitly. The environment (clr..) doesn't do it for us, cause in the whole possible complexity of multithreading it would be impossible. So this definetely responsible and not easy task must be done by the developer, writing multithreading code.

I guess there you can find a great deal of necessary information: Thread Synchronization (C# Programming Guide)

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