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I have the following code:

const int bufferSize = 1024 * 1024;
var buffer = new byte[bufferSize];
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    const int writesCount = 400;
    using (var stream = new MemoryStream(writesCount * bufferSize))
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < writesCount; j++)
        {
            stream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
        }
        stream.Close();
    }
}

which I run on a 32-bit machine.

The first iteration finishes just fine and then on the next iteration I get a System.OutOfMemoryException exception on the line that news the MemoryStream.

Why isn't the previous MemoryStream memory reclaimed despite using statement? How do I force release of memory used by the MemoryStream?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried forcing the Garbage Collector to run? –  Nick Aug 17 '12 at 8:37
    
By the way, after writing to the instance of MemoryStream you are disposing it without saving the content of the stream elsewhere. Why write to the stream if the stream is un-used after writing? –  Sergey Brunov Aug 17 '12 at 8:46
2  
@Serge: This is a snippet to illustrate the problem, that's why. –  sharptooth Aug 17 '12 at 8:48
1  
Actually you don't have to call stream.Close(). The using will take call stream.Dispose(), which in turn calls the Close() already. click here for further reading –  Manuzor Aug 17 '12 at 8:48
1  
Use smaller buffers and/or reuse them. –  CodesInChaos Aug 17 '12 at 8:52

4 Answers 4

I don't think the problem is the garbage collector not doing its job. If the GC is under memory pressure it should run and reclaim the 400 MBs you've just allocated.

This is more likely down to the GC not finding a contigious 400 MB block.

Rather, an “out of memory” error happens because the process is unable to find a large enough section of contiguous unused pages in its virtual address space to do the requested mapping.

You should read Eric Lippert's blog entry "Out Of Memory" Does Not Refer to Physical Memory

You're far better off doing both of the below.

  1. Reusing the memory block you've allocated (why are you creating another with the exact same size)
  2. Allocating much smaller chunks (less than 85KBs)

Prior to Dotnet 4.5, Dotnet constructed two heaps, Small Object Heap (SOH) and Large Object Heap (LOH). See Large Object Hearp Improvements in .NET 4.5 by Brandon Bray. Your MemoryStream is being allocated in LOH, and not compacted (defragmented) for the duration of the process, making it much more likely that multiple calls to allocate this large amount of memory will throw an OutOfMemoryException

The CLR manages two different heaps for allocation, the small object heap (SOH) and the large object heap (LOH). Any allocation greater than or equal to 85,000 bytes goes on the LOH. Copying large objects has a performance penalty, so the LOH is not compacted unlike the SOH. Another defining characteristic is that the LOH is only collected during a generation 2 collection. Together, these have the built-in assumption that large object allocations are infrequent.

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1  
+1 Additionally that buffer will be located in LOH, which is never defragmented (in contrast to SOH). –  oleksii Aug 17 '12 at 9:06

Looks like you're allocating too much than your system can handle. Your code runs fine on my machine, but if I change it like this :

const int bufferSize = 1024 * 1024 * 2;

I get the same error as you.

But if I change the target processor to x64, then the code runs, which seems logical as you can address lot more memory.

Detailed explanation on this article : http://www.guylangston.net/blog/Article/MaxMemory And some information on this question : Maximum Memory a .NET process can allocate

share|improve this answer
    
Seems like the underlying issue to me –  Liam Aug 17 '12 at 8:47

First of all, Dispose() does not guarantee that memory will be released (it does not mark objects for GC collection, in case of MemoryStream - it releases nothing, as MemoryStream has no unmanaged resources). The only reliable way to free memory used by MemoryStream is to lose all references to it and wait for garbage collection to occur (and if you have OutOfMemoryException - garbage collector already tried but failed to free enough memory). Also, allocating such large objects (anything > 85000 bytes) have some consequences - these objects are going to large object heap (LOH), which can get fragmented (and cannot be compacted). As .NET object must occupy a contiguous sequence of bytes, it can lead to a situation where you have enough memory, but there is no room for large object. Garbage collector won't help in this case.

It seems like the main problem here is that reference to a stream object is kept on stack, preventing garbage collection of stream object (even forcing garbage collection won't help, as GC considers that object is still alive, you can check this creating a WeakRefrence to it). Refactoring this sample can fix it:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        const int bufferSize = 1024 * 1024 * 2;
        var buffer = new byte[bufferSize];
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            const int writesCount = 400;
            Write(buffer, writesCount, bufferSize);
        }
    }

    static void Write(byte[] buffer, int writesCount, int bufferSize)
    {
        using(var stream = new MemoryStream(writesCount * bufferSize))
        {
            for(int j = 0; j < writesCount; j++)
            {
                stream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
            }
        }
    }

Here is a sample which proves that object can't be garbage collected:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        const int bufferSize = 1024 * 1024 * 2;
        var buffer = new byte[bufferSize];
        WeakReference wref = null;
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            if(wref != null)
            {
                // force garbage collection
                GC.Collect();
                GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
                GC.Collect();
                // check if object is still alive
                Console.WriteLine(wref.IsAlive); // true
            }
            const int writesCount = 400;
            using(var stream = new MemoryStream(writesCount * bufferSize))
            {
                for(int j = 0; j < writesCount; j++)
                {
                    stream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
                }
                // weak reference won't prevent garbage collection
                wref = new WeakReference(stream);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Try to force garbage collection when you are sure that it is necessary to clean unreferenced objects.

GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
GC.Collect();

Another alternative is to use the Stream with external storage: FileStream, for example.

But, in general case, it would be better to use one small enough buffer (array, allocated one time) and use it for read/write calls. Avoid having many large objects in .NET (see CLR Inside Out: Large Object Heap Uncovered).

Update

Assuming that the writesCount is the constant, the why not allocate one buffer and reuse it?

const int bufferSize = 1024 * 1024;
const int writesCount = 400;

byte[] streamBuffer = new byte[writesCount * bufferSize];
byte[] buffer = new byte[bufferSize];
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    using (var stream = new MemoryStream(streamBuffer))
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < writesCount; j++)
        {
            stream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
isnt dispose supposed to free the memory immediately? –  Filip Aug 17 '12 at 8:41
2  
@Filip no, not immediately. –  Icarus Aug 17 '12 at 8:42
    
@Filip No, It marks that memory as to be collectable by GC. –  L.B Aug 17 '12 at 8:42
    
oh, interesting –  Filip Aug 17 '12 at 8:42
1  
Disposing does NOT mark memory to be collectable by GC, see stackoverflow.com/questions/11359131/… –  Maarten Aug 17 '12 at 8:51

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