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I have an array containing objects that I need to sort, and remove duplicates based on 3 specific values of each array item. Currently I'm using two loops(NOT nested): 1 to sort, another to remove items. Is there a way to remove duplicates while sorting or something similar? For 1000s of items the following code is quite slow and am wondering if there is a faster way:

var list = [
    {a: "Somename", b: "b", c: 10},
    {a: "Anothername", b: "a", c: 12},
    // and so on
];
function sortList(list) {
    // Sort the list based on the 3 specific values
    list = list.sort(function(a,b) {
        a.a = a.a.toLowerCase();
        b.a = b.a.toLowerCase();
        if (a.a < b.a) return -1;
        if (a.a > b.a) return 1;

        a.b = a.b.toLowerCase();
        b.b = b.b.toLowerCase();
        if (a.b < b.b) return -1;
        if (a.b > b.b) return 1;

        if (a.c < b.c) return -1;
        if (a.c > b.c) return 1;

        return 0;
    });

    // Loop through removing duplicates
    for (var a,b,i=list.length-1; i > 0; i--) {
        a = list[i];
        a.a = a.a.toLowerCase();
        a.b = a.b.toLowerCase();

        b = list[i-1];
        b.a = b.a.toLowerCase();
        b.b = b.b.toLowerCase();

        if (a.a===b.a && a.b===b.b && a.c===b.c) list.splice(i-1,1);
    }

    return list;
}
list = sortList(list);

Please no jQuery answers, or answers suggesting the use of another library. It seems a bit of an overkill to import a library to do something this simple.

share|improve this question
    
Arrays don't have any method/property to handle duplicate entries. You'll have to implement it yourself. Preferably remove duplicate first, then sort them. Duplicate removal within a sort callback would interfere the sorting function and would likely causes error due to out of range array indexes. –  Jay Aug 17 '12 at 9:23
    
Am not sure how removing the duplicates before sorting would speed this up. I'd end up having to loop multiple times over the array searching for duplicates that meet my critera(There's other values stored in the objects besides the 3 I am sorting/removing by). Could you give me an example of how to do it efficantly –  SReject Aug 17 '12 at 9:30

2 Answers 2

Instead of using splice in your second loop, just put the unique values in the new array. Thus on each iteration instead of spliceing the existing array you will just append the value to the new array; push is much faster than splice. E.g.:

var newList = [];
if (list) {
    newList.push(list[0];
    for (var a,b,i=1; i < list.length; i++) {
        a = list[i];
        a.a = a.a.toLowerCase();
        a.b = a.b.toLowerCase();

        b = list[i-1];
        b.a = b.a.toLowerCase();
        b.b = b.b.toLowerCase();

        if (a.a!==b.a || a.b!==b.b && a.c!==b.c) {
            newList.push(a);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch(Was just editing my own script to do just that), but not what I'm seeking. –  SReject Aug 17 '12 at 9:40
    
What exactly do you dislike? The filtering loop in my example is O(n) or so (depending of the Array.prototype.push in the specific implementation). It is negligible given you're first sorting the array (which is O(n*log(n)) at the best). –  penartur Aug 17 '12 at 9:43
    
Am seeking a way to drastically increase speed. Currently I'm working with over 3k items, and my current code is hanging the page for ~2-3s. Don't get me wrong every little bit helps so I do appreciate the advice and am implementing it, but need it faster/more efficient. –  SReject Aug 17 '12 at 9:48
    
Have you tried to profile the code? That is, how much of the time does it spend inside the sort, and how much of the time does it spend inside of the filtering (both original version and my example)? –  penartur Aug 17 '12 at 9:55
    
(You have a typo in your code, needs to be: b = list[i+1]). Not yet, though I do know the push will be faster than the splice. –  SReject Aug 17 '12 at 9:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After searching around, I came up with an answer of my own. It still uses the two loops but this is far faster than sorting then removing duplicates, and more consistent than tracking duplicates while sorting. Basically, I loop through the array, saving each item in an object using a concatenation of the property values('key') I want to sort/remove duplicates by. If the key is already stored, I know it's a duplicate and can move on to the next. Otherwise I add the item to a new array. Once duplicates are removed I sort the array and return it:

function sortList(list){
    // Since the 3 properties I'm sorting by can be converted to string I can loop
    // through the specified array, creating 'keys' by concating those property values
    // and adding those 'keys' to a temporary object. If the 'key' is present in the
    // temporary object, I know it's a duplicate in the array and can ignore it.
    // Otherwise I know it's not a duplicate and add it to a new array
    for (var a=0,b=list.length,item,key="",dupObj={},nList=[]; a<b; a++) {
        item=list[a];
        key=item.a.toLowerCase()+"_"+item.b.toLowerCase()+"_"+item.c;
        if(!dupObj[key]) {
            dupObj[key]=true;
            nList.push(item);
        }
    }

    // Now that we have an array without duplicates we can sort the array:
    nList.sort(function(a,b) {
        if ((a.a = a.a.toLowerCase()) < (b.a = b.a.toLowerCase()) return -1;
        if (a.a > b.a) return 1;

        if ((a.b = a.b.toLowerCase()) < (b.b = b.b.toLowerCase())) return -1;
        if (a.b > b.b) return 1;

        if (a.c < b.c) return -1;
        if (a.c > b.c) return 1;

        return 0;
    });

    // return the new list
    return nList;
}
var list = [
    {a: "Somename", b: "b", c: 10},
    {a: "Anothername", b: "a", c: 12},
    // and so on
];
list = sortList(list);
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't you mean if(!dupObj[key])? –  PPvG Aug 17 '12 at 15:04
    
you are right, good catch :) –  SReject Aug 17 '12 at 19:01
    
Are you sure? What I meant was that dupObj.key is equivalent to dupObj['key']. I don't think that's what you meant, but I might be wrong. –  PPvG Aug 17 '12 at 19:06
    
After re-looking at the code I realized I was wrong the way it was before. You are correct, it would try to reference dupObj['key'] instead of evaluating key before trying to reference it in the dupObj –  SReject Aug 17 '12 at 19:10

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