Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I' like to return this short date in the US format, the current culture of my application is en-GB, but I'd like it in en-US.

Here's the code I have so far:

DateTime.Now.AddYears(-2).ToShortDateString();
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use .ToString() extension method and enter the format:

DateTime.Now.AddYears(-2).ToString("M/d/yyyy");

Custom date format options are documented here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8kb3ddd4.aspx

share|improve this answer
1  
How is this specific to the en-US culture the OP wants? –  ken2k Aug 17 '12 at 9:29
    
@ken2k Because this is in the en-US format (month/day/year). Why do you consider this wrong? –  Curt Aug 17 '12 at 9:33
    
You sure about that? On my machine it's M/d/yyyy. –  ken2k Aug 17 '12 at 9:34
    
@ken2k actually, we don't know if the OP means "en-US" as understood by .NET or "en-US" as an identifier used in lots of systems for English-language-as-used-in-the-US locale information, so Curt could be closer to what they really want (hence my giving both approaches). –  Jon Hanna Aug 17 '12 at 9:38
    
@ken2k So you're saying M/d/yyyy is en-US format but MM/dd/yyyy isn't? These are both month/day/year formats, its just MM/dd/yyyy will display month and date as 2 digits. –  Curt Aug 17 '12 at 9:38

You need to ensure that you are using the right culture format string for this to happen.

One way to get this format directly from the culture is:

CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US").DateTimeFormat.ShortDatePattern

For me this returns M/d/yyyy.

var usShortDatePattern = 
             CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US").DateTimeFormat.ShortDatePattern;
DateTime.Now.AddYears(-2).ToString(usShortDatePattern);

The benefit of doing this is that if a user has overridden the Short Date Pattern for en-US in their control panel (Region and Language), they will get the formatting they want.

share|improve this answer

Taken from the documentation:

DateTime.Now.AddYears(-2).ToString("d", new CultureInfo("en-US"));
share|improve this answer
2  
Not sure it's a good idea to change the current thread culture in order to call a ToXXString() methods. There are DateTime method overloads that take a IFormatProvider as parameter (see stackoverflow.com/a/12003141/870604) –  ken2k Aug 17 '12 at 9:25
    
@ken2k: That's one way to do it and is documented in the MSDN. I agree, I would rather use your method, now that I know of it :-) Still, it is not wrong and does not deserve a downvote! –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 17 '12 at 9:26
    
Just to clarify, I didn't downvoted your answer as it's of course not wrong :) –  ken2k Aug 17 '12 at 9:28
    
@ken2k: I didn't think so, this sentence was meant for the anonymous downvoter. BTW: I found something even shorter, have a look :-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 17 '12 at 9:31
    
The documentation is to explain how ToShortDateString() works, for which it needs to change the current locale. It's not appropriate for real code as it could cause a mysterious bug to appear elsewhere in the same application (all of a sudden code in a completely different place that was correctly handling "12,56" for users where that is appropriate as a representation of 12.56 starts throwing exceptions) –  Jon Hanna Aug 17 '12 at 9:41
var culture = new CultureInfo("en-us");
string formatedDate = DateTime
    .Now
    .AddYears(-2)
    .ToString(culture.DateTimeFormat.ShortDatePattern, culture);
share|improve this answer

"I want to apply the en-US short-date-pattern":

DateTime.Now.AddYears(-2).ToString("d", CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US"));

"I want to apply the pattern M/d/yyyy regardless of whether .NET thinks that's the short-pattern for en-US or not:

DateTime.Now.AddYears(-2).ToString(@"M\/d\/yyyy", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)

(Same result as above, but if what you are thinking of as "the US format" was actually MM/dd/yyyy, which is also used in the US, then that's the approach you want, but with @"MM\/dd\/yyyy"instead of @"M\/d\/yyyy".

Finally, "I want to find out the en-US short-date-pattern for use with another call:

CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US").DateTimeFormat.ShortDatePattern
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.