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I am trying to perform a DB access through a DAO object, and I have bumped into the case where I need to query a field in another Entity.

Considering two entities (EntityA and EntityB) that are connected in entity A through the foreign key EntityA.idEntityB.

I have GenericDao<EntityA> daoA and I am trying to get all the results that match a determined field of EntityB: idEntityB.fieldOfB all in the same find method of the dao.

Is it possible? And if so some directions would be nice. Thanks

edit

An example of my code:

Entities

public class EntityA {
    @JoinColumn(name = "id_entity_b", referencedColumnName = "id")
    @ManyToOne(optional = false, fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
    private EntityB idEntityB;
    // getter+setter...
}

public class EntityB {
    // ...
    private String fieldOfB;
    // getter+setter...
}

DAO Access

GenericDao<EntityA> daoA = // ...

Set<Criterion> filter = new HashSet<Criterion>();
filter.add(Restrictions.eq("idEntityB.fieldOfB"));

List<EntityA> list = dao.findByFilter(filter);

The error message is something like "Could not resolve property idEntityB.fieldOfB"

edit 2

I was able to find something like what I want to do. Although my API is slightly different I believe this is helful for anyone who gets across this problem at an early stage of their own project.

http://code.google.com/p/hibernate-generic-dao/

The framework features a powerful and flexible search functionality. This is used by passing a search object to search methods on general and generic DAOs.

Searches with nested properties are fully supported in this project.

share|improve this question
    
Could you post your current code? –  Petr Pudlák Aug 17 '12 at 9:26
    
Why not just load EntytyB via it's ID which is in EntytyA? –  Roman C Aug 17 '12 at 9:33
    
Is the result of your query a collection of type EntityA? –  JamesB Aug 17 '12 at 9:39
    
@JamesB - Yes, the final result would ideally be a List<EntityA> –  nuno Aug 17 '12 at 10:19
1  
I wrote myself a generic DAO which also allows simple filtering on nested subproperties via reflection and Criteria API with dynamic fetching if necessary regarding the filters. When I am back at home I can post some of my code. I first create a tree structure from the filtering property strings like foo.bar.name and then add restrictions on a criteria from that tree. –  djmj Aug 20 '12 at 12:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is my generic Criteria filtering method.

Properties according to bean conventions have following form foo.bar.name.
With Criteria API a tree can be build from a given filtering map and Restrictions can be added. One special case I observed during testing is that filtering on the identifier property does not needs a new subcriteria since this property is already fetched.

/**
 * Creates a detached criteria from the given Type and given map of filters.
 * 
 * @param type Target type the Criteria is build for.
 * @param identifierPropertyName If provided (not null) the identifier
 *            property name can be identified for the given type to simplify
 *            the queries if the identifier property is the only property
 *            used on the parent no subqueries are needed.
 * @param filters
 * 
 * @see #createTree(Set, String)
 * @see #addRestrictions(DetachedCriteria, TreeNode)
 * 
 * @return
 */
public static DetachedCriteria createDetachedCriteria(final Class<?> type, final String identifierPropertyName,
    final Map<String, Criterion> filters)
{
    final DetachedCriteria criteria = DetachedCriteria.forClass(type);

    // add restrictions using tree
    final TreeNode<Entry<String, Criterion>> rootNode = HibernateUtils2.createTree(filters.entrySet(),
        identifierPropertyName);

    final Iterator<TreeNode<Entry<String, Criterion>>> it = rootNode.getChildren().iterator();

    while (it.hasNext())
        HibernateUtils.addRestrictions(criteria, it.next());

    return criteria;
}

/**
 * Creates a Tree from the given Set using a fictional root TreeNode.
 * 
 * @param <T>
 * 
 * @param filters
 * @param identifierPropertyName Property name which is merged with its
 *            parent property. Example: <b>user.id</b> is treated as single
 *            property.
 * @return
 */
public static <T extends Object> TreeNode<Entry<String, T>> createTree(final Set<Entry<String, T>> filters,
    final String identifierPropertyName)
{

    final Iterator<Entry<String, Object>> it = filters.iterator();

    /*
     * create key property tree for Entity properties
     */
    final TreeNode<Entry<String, Object>> rootNode = new TreeNode<Entry<String, Object>>(
        new SimpleEntry<String, Object>("root", null));

    while (it.hasNext())
    {
        final Entry<String, Object> entry = it.next();
        // foo.bar.name
        final String key = entry.getKey();

        String[] props;

        /*
         * check if we have a nested hierarchy
         */
        if (key.contains("."))
        {
            props = key.split("\\.");
            // check for identifier since identifier property name does not
            // need new subcriteria
            if (!StringUtils.isBlank(identifierPropertyName))
            {
                int propsTempLength = props.length - 1;
                if (props[propsTempLength].equals(identifierPropertyName))
                {
                    props = Arrays.copyOf(props, propsTempLength);
                    propsTempLength--;
                    props[propsTempLength] = props[propsTempLength] + "." + identifierPropertyName;
                }
            }

            // check for "this" identifier of beginning, which needs to be
            // added for projections because of hibernate not recognizing it
            if (props.length > 1 && props[0].equals("this"))
            {
                props[0] = "this." + props[1];

                props = ArrayUtils.remove(props, 1);
            }
        }
        else
            props = new String[]
            {
                key
            };

        TreeNode<Entry<String, Object>> currNode = rootNode;

        // create nested criteria
        for (int i = 0; i < props.length; i++)
        {
            Object valueAdd;

            // only leaf needs value
            if (i != props.length - 1)
                valueAdd = null;
            else
                valueAdd = entry.getValue();

            final TreeNode<Entry<String, Object>> childTempNode = new TreeNode<Entry<String, Object>>(
                new SimpleEntry<String, Object>(props[i], valueAdd));

            // try to get the real node
            TreeNode<Entry<String, Object>> childNode = currNode.getChild(childTempNode.getElement());
            // check if we already have a unique node
            if (childNode == null)
            {
                childNode = childTempNode;
                // add new child to set if its a new node
                currNode.addChild(childNode);
            }

            currNode = childNode;
        }
    }

    return rootNode;
}

/**
 * Recursively adds the given Restriction's wrapped in the given TreeNode to
 * the Criteria.
 * 
 * @param criteria
 * @param treeNode
 */
public static void addRestrictions(final DetachedCriteria criteria,
    final TreeNode<Entry<String, Criterion>> treeNode)
{
    // if we have a leaf simply add restriction
    if (treeNode.getChildren().size() == 0)
        criteria.add(treeNode.getElement().getValue());
    else
    {
        // create new sub Criteria and iterate children's
        final DetachedCriteria subCriteria = criteria.createCriteria(treeNode.getElement().getKey());

        final Iterator<TreeNode<Entry<String, Criterion>>> it = treeNode.getChildren().iterator();

        while (it.hasNext())
            HibernateUtils.addRestrictions(subCriteria, it.next());
    }
}

/*
 * Utility classes
 */

/**
 * Generic TreeNode implementation with a Set to hold its children to only allow
 * unique children's.
 */
public class TreeNode<T>
{
    private final T element;

    private final Set<TreeNode<T>> childrens;

    public TreeNode(final T element)
    {
        if (element == null)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Element cannot be null");

        this.element = element;

        this.childrens = new HashSet<TreeNode<T>>();
    }

    public void addChildren(final TreeNode<T> children)
    {
        this.childrens.add(children);
    }

    /**
     * Retrieves the children which equals the given one.
     * 
     * @param children
     * @return If no children equals the given one returns null.
     */
    public TreeNode<T> getChildren(final TreeNode<T> children)
    {
        final Iterator<TreeNode<T>> it = this.childrens.iterator();

        TreeNode<T> next = null;

        while (it.hasNext())
        {
            next = it.next();
            if (next.equals(children))
                return next;
        }

        return null;
    }

    public T getElement()
    {
        return this.element;
    }

    public Set<TreeNode<T>> getChildrens()
    {
        return this.childrens;
    }

    /**
     * Checks if the element of this instance equals the one of the given
     * Object.
     */
    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj)
    {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;

        if (obj != null && obj instanceof TreeNode)
        {
            final TreeNode<?> treeNode = (TreeNode<?>) obj;

            return this.element.equals(treeNode.element);
        }
        else
            return false;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode()
    {
        int hash = 1;
        hash = hash * 17 + this.element.hashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}

Hope this helps you. Or have a look at the generic dao project you mentioned. I knew about this project and checked it out but never downloaded it.

Using this approach a query can be created very simple like following:

Map<String, Object> filters = new HashMap<String, Object>();
filters.put("foo.bar.name", Restrictions.like("name", "peter"));
filters.put("foo.test.id", Restrictions.eq("id", 2));

List<Class> data = HibernateUtils.createDetachedCriteria(Class, "get identifier from sessionFactory", filters).getExecutableCriteria(session).list();

This odd approach to add the property name as the key and into the Restrictions is related to the fact that Restrictions have no getter and setter for property names.

Custom filtering

My real application uses similar code which is not restricted to Criterion class only. For my web tier I created custom filters which are equivalent to Restrictions api but the client does not needs hibernate jar's anymore.

Edit

Generic filtering across non-entities such as component's and composite-id's is not supported. It can easily be extended with help of ClassMetadata to support them without need for reflection.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. My project must support other kinds of operators so I will try to add to you code operator tokens and a generic criteria building mechanism like Utils.buildCriteria(String prop, OPERATOR op, Object value);, where equals applied in FK and the op operator is applied on tha last nested property. This was indeed very helpful. Answer accepted and +1. –  nuno Aug 21 '12 at 8:10
    
I am having trouble finging a compatible implementation of the TreeNode you are using. Could you post the code for it aswell when you can? –  nuno Aug 21 '12 at 9:07
    
Added the TreeNode implementation and fixed the identifier property problem. –  djmj Aug 21 '12 at 20:43
    
@nuno In your question you did not mentioned the use of custom filters. Currently i am using custom filters on my client (client does not need hibernate jar's) And the criteria build method can take any kind of Object (Criterion, Custom-Filter, Object) and adds restrictions depending on the type of value. If you are interested in that approach I can provide you some code. I just removed any unrelated code just to support Criterion's in the answer. –  djmj Dec 14 '12 at 17:24

Have a look at this example: http://viralpatel.net/blogs/hibernate-one-to-one-mapping-tutorial-using-annotation/

You need to declare the relationships between the entities as

public class EntityA {
    @JoinColumn(name = "id_entity_b")
    @ManyToOne(optional = false, fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
    private EntityB idEntityB;
    // getter+setter... and the rest
}

Instead of Integer use EntityB.

That's the point of ORM that Hibernate provides: You don't need to work with keys, you work with objects. Converting this representation into the relational mapping with keys is the work of Hibernate's ORM layer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, actually my code is using it this way. Sorry, I transcripted it wrong from my code. (code in original question is now similar to my code) –  nuno Aug 17 '12 at 13:28
    
... helpful nonetheless. +1 –  nuno Aug 17 '12 at 13:38

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