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I'm dealing with the BigInteger class with numbers in the order of 2 raised to the power 10,000,000.

The BigInteger Log function is now the most expensive function in my algorithm and I am desperately looking for an alternative.

Since I only need the integral part of the log, I came across this answer which seems brilliant in terms of speed but for some reason I am not getting accurate values. I do not care about the decimal part but I do need to get an accurate integral part whether the value is floored or ceiled as long as I know which.

Here is the function I implemented:

public static double LogBase2 (System.Numerics.BigInteger number)
{
    return (LogBase2(number.ToByteArray()));
}

public static double LogBase2 (byte [] bytes)
{
    // Corrected based on [ronalchn's] answer.
    return (System.Math.Log(bytes [bytes.Length - 1], 2) + ((bytes.Length - 1) * 8));
}

The values are now incredibly accurate except for corner cases. The values 7 to 7.99999, 15 to 15.9999, 23 to 23.9999 31 to 31.9999, etc. return -Infinity. The numbers seem to revolve around byte boundaries. Any idea what's going on here?

Example:

LogBase2(                    1081210289) = 30.009999999993600 != 30.000000000000000
LogBase2(                    1088730701) = 30.019999999613300 != 30.000000000000000
LogBase2(                    2132649894) = 30.989999999389400 != 30.988684686772200
LogBase2(                    2147483648) = 31.000000000000000 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                    2162420578) = 31.009999999993600 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                    4235837212) = 31.979999999984800 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                    4265299789) = 31.989999999727700 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                    4294967296) = 32.000000000000000 != 32.000000000000000
LogBase2(                    4324841156) = 32.009999999993600 != 32.000000000000000
LogBase2(                  545958373094) = 38.989999999997200 != 38.988684686772200
LogBase2(                  549755813887) = 38.999999999997400 != 38.988684686772200
LogBase2(                  553579667970) = 39.009999999998800 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                  557430119061) = 39.019999999998900 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                  561307352157) = 39.029999999998300 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                  565211553542) = 39.039999999997900 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                  569142910795) = 39.049999999997200 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                 1084374326282) = 39.979999999998100 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                 1091916746189) = 39.989999999998500 != -Infinity
LogBase2(                 1099511627775) = 39.999999999998700 != -Infinity
share|improve this question
    
Is it just a massive coincidence that none of these overestimate the log? I would've thought all it would take was LSB > MSB. –  Rawling Aug 17 '12 at 10:20
    
Oh wait, there are a few. Still, I'd have expected it to be closer to 50/50. –  Rawling Aug 17 '12 at 10:31
    
Hmmm... it seems as if BigInteger seems to keep an extra most significant byte when the integral number reaches multiples of 8? The -Infinity is the result of Log(0). –  Raheel Khan Aug 17 '12 at 12:25
    
The extra byte ensures that the most significant bit is 0 for a positive integer. –  ronalchn Aug 17 '12 at 14:21
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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Try this:

public static int LogBase2(byte[] bytes)
{
    if (bytes[bytes.Length - 1] >= 128) return -1; // -ve bigint (invalid - cannot take log of -ve number)
    int log = 0;
    while ((bytes[bytes.Length - 1]>>log)>0) log++;
    return log + bytes.Length*8-9;
}

The reason for the most significant byte being 0 is because the BigInteger is a signed integer. When the most significant bit of the high-order byte is 1, an extra byte is tacked on to represent the sign bit of 0 for positive integers.

Also changed from using the System.Math.Log function because if you only want the rounded value, it is much faster to use bit operations.


If you have Microsoft Solver Foundation (download at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/devlabs/hh145003.aspx), then you can use the BitCount() function:

public static double LogBase2(Microsoft.SolverFoundation.Common.BigInteger number)
{
    return number.BitCount;
}

Or you can use the java library. Add a reference to the vjslib library (found in the .NET tab - this is the J# implementation of the java library).

You can now add "using java.math" in your code.

java.math.BigInteger has a bitLength() function

share|improve this answer
2  
@ronalchn: Yup, ToByteArray is little-endian (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  Rawling Aug 17 '12 at 10:14
    
Comment deleted - apologies, my mistake. –  David M Aug 17 '12 at 10:16
2  
This should work. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 17 '12 at 10:23
    
@ronalchn: Thanks, that worked but there seem to be some corner cases. I've edited the question. Please have a look. –  Raheel Khan Aug 17 '12 at 12:20
    
+1 for the solver foundation suggestion. –  Raheel Khan Aug 17 '12 at 19:11
show 1 more comment
BigInteger bi = new BigInteger(128);   
int log =  bi.Log2();

public static class BigIntegerExtensions
{
    static int[] PreCalc = new int[] { 8, 7, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1};
    public static int Log2(this BigInteger bi)
    {
        byte[] buf = bi.ToByteArray();
        int len = buf.Length;
        return len * 8 - PreCalc[buf[len - 1]] - 1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. ronalchn's answer does fix the bug I posted so I will accept his answer out of fairness. Although accuracy is non-negotiable, I am willing to go lengths for speed as well. Could you please help me understand how this look-up is working in concept? I wouldn't want to use code without fully understanding it. Thanks again. –  Raheel Khan Aug 17 '12 at 19:39
1  
@RaheelKhan: All these answers do a log2 on only the top byte, of which there are 128 possible inputs. L.B has precalculated the log2 of each of these inputs, so the processor doesn't have to calculate them at runtime. This should be just as accurate as ronalchn's answer, but on modern computers this is faster. –  Mooing Duck Aug 17 '12 at 19:43
    
@RaheelKhan In short, your log2 is bytes.Length*8, but if MSB has leading zeros you should subtract them from the result. For ex, 64(0x40) has two leading zeros to subtract(in fact 1 since MS bit determines the sign) –  L.B Aug 17 '12 at 19:51
    
By the way, do you think changing the int[] to byte[] will help by reducing an implicit cast or would the array indexer change it to an int anyways? –  Raheel Khan Aug 17 '12 at 19:53
    
@RaheelKhan I tested in both ways and didn't see much change in speed. I left it as int since, maybe, accessing the nums on the computer's word boundries can be faster. –  L.B Aug 17 '12 at 19:55
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