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In python I would like to export an object-method as a normal function. The object will be closed over. Like in the following:

from functools import partial

class A(object):
    def __init__(self,a):
        self.a = a

    def m(self,b):
        return self.a+b

    def exportm(self):
        return lambda b,self=self: self.m(b)
        #return partial(self.m,self=self)

f = A(10).exportm()

print f(5)

This works well and prints 15 as expected. But if I replace the return-lambda-line with the commented line it will fail giving the following error:

TypeError: m() got multiple values for keyword argument 'self'

I understand that using functools is cleaner than resorting to lambda expressions. So I'd like to know how to do this using partial or some other tool in functools.

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2 Answers 2

self.m is already bound, so there's no need to pass self=self to it. Simply return self.m. For more arguments, use partial(self.m, ...):

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, a):
        self.a = a

    def m(self, b, c):
        return self.a + b + c

    def exportm(self):
        return partial(self.m, 300)

f = A(10).exportm()
print f(5)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, that works and looks very clean. –  life of pi Aug 17 '12 at 10:21

Follow the KISS principle. There's no need to use something that kind of makes your code look more professional. As thg435 already said return self.m would do.

The leaner your code is the simpler it is to comprehend it, both by yourself, when you read your code in, say a month, and by other devs.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree: for this example it looks like total overkill, but that's because I stripped it down to show my point. –  life of pi Aug 17 '12 at 10:36

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