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I have a class that uses a struct, and I want to overload the << operator for that struct, but only within the class:

typedef struct my_struct_t {
  int a;
  char c;
} my_struct;

class My_Class
{
  public:
    My_Class();
    friend ostream& operator<< (ostream& os, my_struct m);
}

I can only compile when I declare the operator<< overload w/ the friend keyword, but then the operator is overloaded everywhere in my code, not just in the class. How do I overload the << operator for my_struct ONLY within the class?

Edit: I will want to use the overloaded operator to print a my_struct which IS a member of My_Class

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2  
But it's only overloaded when you're calling operator<< with a my_struct, so isn't that ok? –  Dominic Rodger Jul 29 '09 at 14:02
3  
Note that the 'typedef struct' idiom isn't really necessary in C++: stackoverflow.com/questions/612328/… –  Nick Meyer Jul 29 '09 at 14:09
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

How do I overload the << operator for my_struct ONLY within the class?

Define it as

static std::ostream & operator<<( std::ostream & o, const my_struct & s ) { //...

or

namespace {
    std::ostream & operator<<( std::ostream & o, const my_struct & s ) { //...
}

in the .cpp file in which you implement MyClass.

EDIT: If you really, really need to scope on the class and nothing else, then define it as a private static function in said class. It will only be in scope in that class and it's subclasses. It will hide all other custom operator<<'s defined for unrelated classes, though (again, only inside the class, and it's subclasses), unless they can be found with ADL, or are members of std::ostream already.

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Assumes one .cpp file only contains one class, which is often not the case. –  anon Jul 29 '09 at 14:20
    
That's the case for most of my classes. If there's a second class in the .cpp file, it's an implementation detail of the "main" class, and the extended exposure won't matter. And it helps keep the .h file clean, which should never be underestimated. –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Jul 29 '09 at 14:27
    
+1 I thought that the unnamed namespace would break ADL rules, but after testing with both g++ and comeau it seems as if it does not. Nice. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 29 '09 at 14:28
    
The other issue, which the questioner does not make clear, is does he want to use any memebers of My_Class, during the output? If he does, the private member is the only real option. –  anon Jul 29 '09 at 14:31
1  
+1. I agree with Neil that this solution has the limitation that it "assumes one .cpp file only contains one class". However, C++ doesn't provide a particularly clean way to do what the question is asking. Personally I find that scoping definitions in a .cpp implementation file often works well enough, and is probably an underutilized technique. I think most people learning C and C++ come away with the impression that you should to put all namespace-scope definitions in a .h file, rather than striving for clean and minimally-defined interfaces. –  Marsh Ray Jul 29 '09 at 14:39
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Don't use operator <<. Use a named member function, and make it private.

class My_Class
{
  public:
    My_Class();
 private:
    void Print( ostream & os, const my_struct & m );
};

Note you should pass the structure as a const reference, whichever method you use.

Edit: There is no need to make the operator << a member of the class just so you can use it to print a member of the class. You can make it a friend of the struct, or a completely free function, which the class then uses.

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If by "only overloaded in the My_Class" you mean only visible / usable by my class you could use a non-member overload that's only visible to My_Class. E.g.

   struct my_struct {
      int a;
      char c;
   };

   class My_Class
   {
      publiC:
         My_Class();
   }

Then in My_Class.cpp:

namespace {
    ostream& operator(ostream& os, const my_struct& mystruct ) {
         os << mystruct.a << mystruct.c;
    }
}
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Why are you deleting & undeleting answers that say the same thing? –  anon Jul 29 '09 at 14:22
    
I meant to edit and somehow got a copy of the answer. So I deleted the first one. Then the question changed so I deleted my 2nd one and was going to add a third answer but SO suggested that I edit an existing one so I undeleted the first one and edited by which time it was a clone of yours :-( –  maccullt Jul 29 '09 at 15:10
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