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Consider the following:

public class EntityBase<TEntity>
{
    public virtual void DoSomethingWhereINeedToKnowAboutTheEntityType()
    {
    }
}

public class PersonEntity : EntityBase<PersonEntity>
{
    public override void DoSomethingWhereINeedToKnowAboutTheEntityType()
    {
    }
}

I added this into code and ran it and it worked ok, but I'm surprised that I can inherit a class who's definition is based on the inheriting class.

When I tried it I was expecting either it not to compile, or to fail once actually called.

You can do something similar with an interface:

public interface IEntityBase<TEntity>
{}

public class PersonEntity : IEntityBase<PersonEntity>
{}

I've actually switched my code from the former to the later, using the interface, but I'm still curious why this works.

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5  
Notice that you do this all the time when you implement IComparable<T> and IEquatable<T> on an object. –  Menno van den Heuvel Aug 17 '12 at 12:19
    
@FishBasketGordo. TY for the edit - mixing my vb and c#! –  Jon Egerton Aug 17 '12 at 12:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm surprised that I can inherit a class who's definition is based on the inheriting class.

Careful - what you're inheriting is a class whose definition involves an arbitrary Type, is all. All of these are legal:

class O : EntityBase<object>
class S : EntityBase<String>
class Q : EntityBase<Q>

All you've said in the definition of EntityBase is that TEntity should be a type - well, PersonEntity is a type, isn't it? So why shouldn't it be eligible to be a TEntity? No reason why not - so it works.

You might be concerned about the order of definitions, but remember that within the unit of compilation, everything gets defined 'at once' - there's no sense in which PersonEntity needs to be compiled 'before' anything else (including itself!) can refer to it. Indeed, you're even allowed

class A : EntityBase<B>
class B : EntityBase<A>

for which no conceivable 'order of compilation' could work, if such a thing were needed.

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This is the answer that's laid it out best for me. I use Generics all the time, am a big fan, but was getting my head in a muddle. (Its Friday!) –  Jon Egerton Aug 17 '12 at 12:42

It works because there's no reason why it wouldn't work. EntityBase<PersonEntity> doesn't inherit from PersonEntity, it merely references the type. There's no technical problem with a base class knowing about its own derived class. This also works (even though this specific example is a bad idea):

public class A
{
    public B AsB()
    {
        return this as B;
    }
}


public class B : A
{
}
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A very simple example is the generic interface IComparable<T>. Usually, you implement it like this:

class MyClass : IComparable<MyClass> {/*...*/}

This implementation of the generic template is just saying that MyClass objects can compare to other MyClass objects. As you can see, there is no problem with the mental model. I can very well understand the concept of a class whose objects can compare between them without knowing anything else about the class.

The main point here is that template parameters are just used by the generic class or interface, but they need not be related by inheritance at all. IComparable<MyClass> does not inherit from MyClass. So there is no circularity.

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