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I'm writing my own scope (i.e. a class which implements org.springframework.beans.factory.config.Scope) and I need some beans injected. How do I do that?

Background: Spring must create all scope beans first so that I can define which beans go into the scope. But what about beans that I need to build the scope in the first place?

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Does Spring complain about not finding those bean's when you try to start your application? – nicholas.hauschild Aug 17 '12 at 13:56
    
No, the fields just stay null. I could make the scope ApplicationContextAware but as I said, the context is in the middle of its initialization, so most of the beans are either not created, yet, or only halfway initialized (so some @Autowired fields are set, others are not). – Aaron Digulla Aug 17 '12 at 14:02
    
Just out of curiosity, do you happen to know if any of existing Scope implementations uses injection that way...? This simply seems like you're trying to use framework's feature before it's available (I see scope as injection's prerequisite, so to speak)... – Less Aug 17 '12 at 14:46
    
I agree, it's a corner case and no, I haven't seen any other scope try such a stunt. But I still think it's useful to share beans between a scope and the appContext. – Aaron Digulla Aug 17 '12 at 14:53
    
Shot in the dark: try implementing AopInfrastructureBean in beans you want to inject to your custom scope. – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Aug 17 '12 at 16:03

I came up with this workaround which seems to be pretty safe but I'd like to hear comments (or maybe my answer gives you some better ideas):

  1. Define the scope and give it setters (instead of using @Autowired)
  2. Create a "scope configurer" bean:

    public CustomScopeConfigurer {
        @Autowired private Foo foo;
        private CustomScope scope;
    
        public CustomScopeConfigurer( CustomScope scope ) {
            this.scope = scope;
        }
    
        @PostConstruct
        public void initScope() {
            scope.setFoo( foo );
        }
    }
    

    This configurer bean must not be lazy.

Reasoning:

  1. The scope itself can't use autowiring because it is created before the first bean. While it might be created later, you can be sure that it will be created before every other bean. So autowiring can't work reliably.

  2. The configurer bean will be created alongside all the other beans but after the scope. So autowiring will work for it.

  3. Since the configurer bean isn't initialized lazy, it will be created before the rest of the application can see the application context. This means that no beans for the scope (i.e. beans with @Scope("custom")) can have been created at this time - the scope can't be "active", yet -> Spring won't have tried to put any beans into it, yet.

  4. The scope itself is usually created as a static constant somewhere. That's why we have to pass it as an argument to the constructor.

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Did this actually work? I'm presuming you have to instantiate the scope object manually, so how does line 3 retrieve that instance and not create a new one? – Tom Jenkinson Feb 2 '15 at 18:14
    
@TomJenkinson: Good catch. You're right, you have to pass the scope as a constructor argument. – Aaron Digulla Feb 10 '15 at 10:54
    
@AaronDigulla There may be chance of getting some bugs. Consider the below scenario: First CustomScopeConfigurer bean will be created, immediately CustomScope bean will be created and now our custom scope is ready to use. After some time CustomScopeConfigurer will be created which initializes foo into CustomScope. But what happenes if some custom scoped beans are created after CustomScope registration and before CustomScopeConfigurer bean creation? For those beans there will be not foo in the CustomScope. I tried finding solution to this but I didn't get one. Coutld you please try on it? :) – Jagadeesh Nov 29 '15 at 13:02
    
@AaronDigulla I gave simple solution to your question. Please follow and suggest me immprovements. :) – Jagadeesh Nov 29 '15 at 13:23

You can do that very simply.

Consider the below Custom scope class:

package com.way2learn;

import java.util.Map;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.ObjectFactory;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.config.Scope;

public class MyCustomScope implements Scope{

    private Map<String, Object> scope;

    public void setScope(Map<String, Object> scope) {
        this.scope = scope;
    }

    @Override
    public Object get(String name, ObjectFactory<?> objectFactory) {
        checkAndClear();
        Object bean=scope.get(name);
        if(bean==null){
            bean=objectFactory.getObject();
            scope.put(name,bean);
        }
        return bean;
    }
    private void checkAndClear() {
        //Some logic to check condition and clear the scope
    }
    //optional methods
    @Override
    public Object remove(String name) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public void registerDestructionCallback(String name, Runnable callback) {

    }

    @Override
    public Object resolveContextualObject(String key) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public String getConversationId() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

}

It has dependency on java.util.Map.

You can not autowire using @Autowired it as @Autowired annotation works after AutoWiredAnnotationBeanPostProcessor only.

But Custom scopes will be registered before AutoWiredAnnotationBeanPostProcessor.

So you can manually inject Map into MyCustomScope class as below:

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xmlns:util="http://www.springframework.org/schema/util"
    xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/context http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context-4.1.xsd
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/util http://www.springframework.org/schema/util/spring-util-4.1.xsd">

        <util:map key-type="java.lang.String" value-type="java.lang.Object" id="custScopeMap"/>

        <bean id="myCustomScope" class="com.way2learn.MyCustomScope">
            <property name="scope" ref="custScopeMap"/>
        </bean>

        <bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.CustomScopeConfigurer">
            <property name="scopes">
                <map>
                    <entry key="myScope" value-ref="myCustomScope"/>
                </map>
            </property>
        </bean>

</beans>

I tried it. It works fine. And I found a bug in Aaron Digulla's answer i.e.

Consider the below scenario: First Spring's CustomScopeConfigurer bean will be created, immediately CustomScope bean will be created and now our custom scope is ready to use. After some time Aaron Digulla's CustomScopeConfigurer will be created which initializes foo into CustomScope. But what happenes if some custom scoped beans are created after CustomScope registration and before Aaron Digulla's CustomScopeConfigurer bean creation? For those beans there will be not foo in the CustomScope bean.

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I guess the limitation here is that you can't do it with a pure Java config; you have to fall back to an XML config file. Is that correct? – Aaron Digulla Nov 30 '15 at 17:37
    
As for the bug which you found, see reason #3 of my answer. The app context must be complete before a bean can be put into a scope. Even if you wire a scoped bean, you'll just create a proxy. After the context exists, the helper code to select scopes will be active. So it shouldn't be possible/allowed to call Scope.get() before the context is ready. – Aaron Digulla Nov 30 '15 at 17:43

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