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Code written in C++

Environment: Microsoft Visual Studio

I have a vector of maps. First I want to iterate through the first map, get its 'first' and 'second' and save them in some other structure I built (a map of vectors). And then I'll iterate through the left maps in my "vector of maps" and do the same...

Here's my vector of maps:

typedef vector<map<string,unsigned int>> myvec;

And here's the function that should do the work:

void Coogle::make_index(const myvec& the_vec)
{
    //SCAN THE FIRST MAP
    map<string,unsigned int>::iterator map_iter;
    index::iterator idx_iter = the_index.begin();
    for(map_iter=the_vec[0].begin(); map_iter!=the_vec[0].end(); ++map_iter)
    {

    }
}

The 'for' loop should iterate through the first map in the vector. I declared a map iterator because I need it to iterate though the map! Right? Why isn't it working?

the error:

IntelliSense: no operator "=" matches these operands

Thanks a lot !!!


OK now I identified this iterator:

index::iterator idx_iter = the_index.begin();

And here's my 'index':

typedef map<string,vector<unsigned int>> index;

And inside the mentioned 'for' loop I did the following:

    for(map_iter=the_vec[0].begin(); map_iter!=the_vec[0].end(); ++map_iter)
    {
        /*#1*/ idx_iter->first = map_iter->first;
        /*#2*/ idx_iter->second[0] = map_iter->second;
        /*#3*/ idx_iter++;
    }

#2 seems to be ok. But #1 generates an error:

IntelliSense: no operator "=" matches these operands

It's the same error like the one before so I'm guessing it's a similar problem. Is it?

edit: To be more clear, what I wanna do is add from const myvec& the_vec to the 'i' location (in this case '0') to my index.

Again :

typedef vector<map<string,unsigned int>> myvec;
typedef map<string,vector<unsigned int>> index;

Thank you!

share|improve this question
1  
No,that iterator is for the map at the vector's first map element. –  Slims Aug 17 '12 at 12:47
    
@Mahesh, as Slims said, the iterator is for the first map in the vector. And why cbegin() and cend()? I don't think that's the problem. –  Alaa M. Aug 17 '12 at 13:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

the_vec is passed as reference to constant, so you need const_iterator:

map<string,unsigned int>::const_iterator map_iter;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! It wokred. –  Alaa M. Aug 17 '12 at 12:48
    
Can you see the sequenced question below please? :) –  Alaa M. Aug 17 '12 at 13:17
1  
@AdamDe You mean the question that has incorrectly been posted as an answer and should have been posted either as a separate question or as an update of your existing question? –  Christian Rau Aug 17 '12 at 13:23
    
Yes. I'm sorry to post it this way.... –  Alaa M. Aug 17 '12 at 13:29

To answer your second question, you can't modify the keys in a map, since they are required to be kept in order. If you want to replace all the elements in the index, then it's probably best to clear it first, then add the new elements:

the_index.clear();
for(map_iter=the_vec[0].begin(); map_iter!=the_vec[0].end(); ++map_iter)
{
    the_index[map_iter->first].push_back(map_iter->second);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I neither want to clear it nor modify it. I just want to add an element to my index. My index is: typedef map<string,vector<unsigned int>> index; So isn't there a suitable 'inesrt' command for this? Thank you –  Alaa M. Aug 17 '12 at 16:04
    
OK, if you just want to add new elements then use my code without the clear() bit; or use insert if you'd rather (although that gets a bit verbose unless you can use C++11 initialiser lists to write the_index.insert({map_iter->first, {map_iter->second}})). Your code was iterating through the index and trying to change the keys, so I assumed you wanted to replace the existing elements. –  Mike Seymour Aug 17 '12 at 16:41
    
map_iter->second is an int. the_index consists of a string, and a vector of ints. I understand the the_index[map_iter->first]. But does the continuation ( .push_back(map_iter->second) ) create a vector and a map_iter->second assigned to it? –  Alaa M. Aug 17 '12 at 17:07
1  
@AdamDe: operator[] creates an element if it wasn't already there, so the continuation adds that value to the newly created vector. Although you will also need to deal with the situation where the key already exists, so it might be better to use insert instead. –  Mike Seymour Aug 17 '12 at 17:12
    
Thanks a lot!!! That's what I'm looking for then :) Thank you –  Alaa M. Aug 17 '12 at 17:14

Here is a way to iterate through a map that contains keys of strings and values of vectors of strings:

for( map<string, vector<string>>::iterator ii = timeZonesMap.begin(); ii != timeZonesMap.end(); ++ii)
{
    cout << ii->first << ": " << endl;
    for(std::vector<string>::iterator it = ii->second.begin(); it != ii->second.end(); ++it) {
        std::cout << *it << endl;
    }
}

Hopefully this helps someone in the future

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