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I need a vector image of a Wikipedia navbox. Unfortunately, Inkscape can't open the HTML file, and neither Opera nor Chromium can save the page as SVG. Googling, googling, and yet more googling turned up nothing; in particular, 'HTML2svg' seems to mean functionality where the HTML 'talks to' an SVG image inside it. Does anybody how to turn HTML into SVG, either the entire page or a div on the page? I need the styled HTML, CSS and all.

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Good question, but I doubt there is anything out there for this. It would depend on Webkit, or some other engine, being able to output in some vector form. I suspect it outputs straight raster, but am not sure of the internals. –  Brad Aug 17 '12 at 12:34
    
Maybe render the page to a pdf, and then to an svg? It will depend on how the browser renders the page to a pdf. Some will actually insert text, others will render it to and image and place that into the pdf. Worth a shot though. –  xthexder Aug 17 '12 at 13:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+100

I managed to find a website that will do the conversion for you. All you have to do is paste the HTML in between line breaks and it does the rest. The URL is: http://www.hiqpdf.com/demo/ConvertHtmlToSvg.aspx

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so perfect! Just saved me HOURS! And improved the quality of what I was doing! So nice it gets the text as font and everything! I couldn't be happier –  David Silva Smith Sep 20 at 20:57
    
I don't like that it's not a free solution :( Boo expensive licences. –  JeremyFelix Nov 17 at 0:32

Tried xthexder's advice: printing to file. (And then converting PDF to SVG.) I tried Opera, Firefox, and Chromium under Linux; overview below. Real pity about Opera's bugs.

I've made this answer community wiki; additions for other OSes welcome.

Opera 11.61 (Linux)

  • supports printing to SVG(!), PDF, and PS
  • uses author style sheet (unless you choose a different style sheet from the View menu, or disable CSS)
  • With PDF and PS output, no text is put in the file! This is v. strange and must be a bug.
  • If I choose SVG output, Opera produce a .svg file but writes PostScript code in it. :-(

Firefox 11.0 (Linux)

  • supports printing to PDF and PS
  • ignores author style sheet, prints in black and white
  • Uses DejaVu Serif font in a somewhat large size

Chromium 17 (Linux)

  • supports printing to PDF only
  • ignores author style sheet, prints in black and white
  • Uses Times New Roman
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1  
Opera doesn't itself produce SVG output when printing, but the printer driver (not controlled by Opera) may translate the drawing commands and allow saving to different file formats e.g svg. –  Erik Dahlström Aug 20 '12 at 11:17

You can try wkhtmltoimage It can convert HTML to SVG and many different formats

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I've come across the same need and found the following free utilities which hold promise that this is possible:

  1. WebVector is an HTML to SVG or PNG convertor. It converts a HTML document into a vector image in SVG format or a bitmap image in PNG format. The Standard Vector Graphics (SVG) files can be further edited by a variety of vector graphics editors such as Inkscape.
    http://cssbox.sourceforge.net/webvector/

  2. CutyCapt is a small cross-platform command-line utility to capture WebKit's rendering of a web page into a variety of vector and bitmap formats, including SVG, PDF, PS, PNG, JPEG, TIFF, GIF, and BMP. See IECapt for a similar tool based on Internet Explorer.
    http://cutycapt.sourceforge.net/

  3. wkhtmltopdf and wkhtmltoimage are open source (LGPL) command line tools to render HTML into PDF and various image formats using the QT Webkit rendering engine. These run entirely "headless" and do not require a display or display service. There is also a C library, if you're into that kind of thing.
    http://wkhtmltopdf.org/

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Unanswered Questions: I know that you can use something like rasterize.js to render DOM objects into <canvas>, but I wonder if that offers some clue as to whether a similar process can be taken further? Specifically, can webkit itself be used to output editable SVG (as in illustrator or inkscape) of web content and HTML snippets? How are these libraries built, do they seriously implement all the WC3 recommendations themselves and build an entirely new renderer which outputs to SVG, or is there a simpler solution which can be built on top of an existing renderer which allows SVG output? (Or is this all just strange magic arcana..)

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