Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a little sample I was helping myself for understanding constructors working with many scenarios. I am surprised why static constructors in this scene is not being hit at all.

I am well aware about the Static constructors and even have experienced how they work. I know that, first the static constructor in the derived class gets hit and then the one in base class and then any other constructors. But I don't know why in this particular case where I "ENFORCE" base class parameterized constructor to work, is this the reason the static constructors are not getting hit ? This is what I could suspect/understand, however I may be wrong. But I cannot agree with this, if this is going to be the reason.

Here s the code I worked in VS 2010 now:

    public class MyBaseClass
    {
        public MyBaseClass(int x)
        {
        }
        static MyBaseClass()
        {
        }
    }

    public class MyDerivedClass : MyBaseClass
    {
        public MyDerivedClass(int i)
            : base(5)
        {
        }
        public MyDerivedClass() : base(2)
        {
        }
        static MyDerivedClass()
        {
        }
        public static void Main()
        {
            new MyDerivedClass();
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
What do the static constructors actually do? How do you know they are not being hit? Have you put in breakpoints? Or is there logic that should be run that isn't? It is hard to tell what exactly is going on when all of the methods are empty. –  cadrell0 Aug 17 '12 at 13:43
2  
I can't reproduce, with a Main() method on a different class OR as you have posted. Putting breakpoints on the static constructors as well as the new call will break on all of them. –  Oded Aug 17 '12 at 13:43
1  
What might make things confusing is that I don't see the static constructors if I continually use "Step into" in VS. I only see that they're executed when I set a breakpoint. –  hvd Aug 17 '12 at 13:46
    
Why would you see them executed if you are not breaking? –  Oded Aug 17 '12 at 13:47
    
@cadrell0: Buddy, I started the application with "F11" which would take you from the very beginning of the program execution :) "And", I have put the break point in the Main function itself :) I did analyzed it properly before posting here, anyway thank you, lets investigate further if I am not wrong. –  Divine Aug 17 '12 at 13:48

1 Answer 1

EDIT - Inconsistent and incomplete testing led to an incorrect answer on my part, and with the interest of clear, concise and CORRECT answers, this post has been entirely updated.

The difference between static and non-static constructors:

A static constructor is called automatically before the first use of an object. It's purpose is to set up any static fields/properties/objects(etc.) of itself before any instantiation of itself occurs. Therefore if I define class A to have a static constructor, and create an instance of A, the static constructor will execute before A is instantiated.

Let's say for example that I construct two instances of A, I only see the static constructor for A once...why!? Because static construction only needs to occur once for a particular object type. Beyond that, there is no point in performing static constructions because its already been done!

Consider the following code for this exercise:

    public class A
    {
        static A()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello from static A");
        }

        public A()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello from non-static A");
        }
    }

    public class B : A
    {
        static B()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello from static B");
        }

        public B() : base() //explicit so you know B() will call A()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello from non-static B");
        }
    }

Consider the following instantiation of A and it's results:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A instance_1 = new A();

        Console.Read();
    }
}

Results: Hello from static A, Hello from non-static A

Since A is instantiated once in this instance, static A is called, then non-static A

Consider the following instantiation of A (x2) and it's results:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A instance_1 = new A();
        A instance_2 = new A();

        Console.Read();
    }
}

Results: Hello from static A, Hello from non-static A, Hello from non-static A

As A is instantiated twice, static A is called once (as static A is a one-time operation) and non-static A is called twice to create two instances of A

Consider the following instantiation of B assigned to from A and it's results:

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            A instance_1 = new B();

            Console.Read();
        }
    }

Results: Hello from static B, Hello from static A, Hello from non-static A, Hello from non-static B

Now both A and B are being statically constructed (first time only) because B is a descendant of A. This is evident as well in that non-static B calls non-static A. as A is the ancestor or B

Finally consider this example...

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A instance_1 = new B();
        B instance_2 = new B();

        Console.Read();
    }
}

Results: Hello from static B, Hello from static A, Hello from non-static A, Hello from non-static B, Hello from non-static A, Hello from non-static B

Again, A and B are statically constructed (one time only) but non-static A and non-static B repeat as their are now two instances of B, therefore the non-static construction occurs for every new instance of the object

It might be worth also taking note that it appears that static construction and non-static construction calls in inheritance work the opposite way round to each other. I.E. in the last example, static B is called before static A, however non-static A is called before non-static B!

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thank you for sharing this inputs, but can I say B inst2 = new B() will also have to call static A if A inst1 = new B() wasn't there ? As static constructors has to be called once. I may be wrong. But wondering. –  Divine Aug 17 '12 at 14:06
    
No...if A is never declared or assigned to, static A() will never be called. –  series0ne Aug 17 '12 at 14:09
    
B instance = new B() will call default ctor A, then default ctor B –  series0ne Aug 17 '12 at 14:09
    
Consider using composition pattern if you need B to call static A...you can read my article on advanced composition pattern here: codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/14542/… –  series0ne Aug 17 '12 at 14:10
    
Hi Matthew: Well I get the result as Hello From static ctor A Hello From default ctor A Hello From B When I just have B inst2 = new B(); –  Divine Aug 17 '12 at 14:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.