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How can I implement something like the following:

declare @myInt int
set @myInt=(select count(*) from x)
;with x as

(
select row_number() over(partition by c.patientid order by c.admissiondate) as rn
    ,c.patientid,c.admissiondate
    ,max(c.claimsfromdate)  as maxHemiDate
    ,min(c.claimsfromdate) minHemiDate  
    ,(
        select max(c2.claimsfromdate)
            from claims as c2
            where c2.patientid=c.patientid
            group by c2.patientid
     ) as maxClaimsDate

         ,p.drgCode
         ,datediff(dd,min(c.claimsfromdate),max(c.claimsfromdate)) /7 as weeksWithHemi
         from claims as c inner join icdclaims as ci on ci.id=c.id
         inner join tblicd as t on t.icd_id=ci.icd_id
         inner join patient as p on p.patientid=c.patientid
         and p.admissiondate = c.admissiondate
         and p.dischargedate = c.dischargedate
         where t.icdText like '%X%'  and p.statecode='21'
         group by c.patientid, c.admissiondate, p.drgCode
)

select p.patientid, count(*)
    from patient as p
    left join x on x.patientid=p.patientid
    where x.patientid is null
    group by p.patientid

The error thrown when this is executed is

invalid object name x

I kinda figured that this would happen since the variable declaration is outside of the CTE. If I move the declaration inside of the parentheses of WITH I get another error.

How can I assign a variable like this inside a CTE? Or can you not use a variable that draws data from the CTE at all?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are using SQL Server 2005 or later, you can put the total on each row:

select t.*, cnt, count(*) over () as NumRows
from (select p.patientid, count(*) as cnt
      from patient as p left join
           x
           on x.patientid=p.patientid
      where x.patientid is null
      group by p.patientid
    ) t

In case you are using the total to calculate percentages, or something like that, it might be convenient to have the value on each row.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but null is not needed. Empty parentheses work though. –  Nikola Markovinović Aug 17 '12 at 14:32
    
@NikolaMarkovinović . . . I like to put something between the parentheses, to make the intent more apparent. –  Gordon Linoff Aug 17 '12 at 14:37
1  
Yes, but this produces Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'null'.. You might have put partition by null, but null by itself will not work. –  Nikola Markovinović Aug 17 '12 at 14:39
    
@NikolaMarkovinović . . . thank you. I fixed it. –  Gordon Linoff Aug 17 '12 at 14:42

To get in @myInt number of rows, you can do:

declare @myInt int
;with x as
(
   __your query__
)
select p.patientid, count(*)
    from patient as p
    left join x on x.patientid=p.patientid
    where x.patientid is null
    group by p.patientid


set @myInt=@@ROWCOUNT 

EDITED (Due Jon Egerton comment) If you need to count x rows, then a temporay table is the way:

declare @myInt int
;with x as
(
   __your query__
)
select * 
into #tmp_x
from x;

set @myInt=(select count(*) from #tmp_x)

select p.patientid, count(*)
    from patient as p
    left join #tmp_x x on x.patientid=p.patientid
    where x.patientid is null
    group by p.patientid

Thanks Jon Egerton

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for solution, +1 for your crazy query –  wootscootinboogie Aug 17 '12 at 13:55
    
That will show the number of rows in the returned data, not the number of rows in the x CTE though. –  Jon Egerton Aug 17 '12 at 13:55
    
@JonEgerton, you are right. I edited answer. Thanks. –  danihp Aug 17 '12 at 14:00
    
good solution.. –  wootscootinboogie Aug 17 '12 at 14:06
    
not enough good ;) –  danihp Aug 17 '12 at 15:11

You can't use a single CTE for two distinct statements - they go out of scope.

So either you need to remove the need for the variable, or you can just declare a table variable and then keep selecting on that as many times as you like.

You can declare table var as follows:

declare @x table (rowno int, patientid varchar...

Then you can fill that using the select that you've currently got in your CTE.

share|improve this answer
    
something for me to look into, thanks. –  wootscootinboogie Aug 17 '12 at 13:59

The problem is with this line:

set @myInt=(select count(*) from x)

You are trying to do the select on x before it has been declared!

UPDATE

In this case it would be best to use a temporary table or table variable rather than a CTE. For example:

declare @myInt int

select row_number() over(partition by c.patientid order by c.admissiondate) as rn
    ,c.patientid,c.admissiondate
    ,max(c.claimsfromdate)  as maxHemiDate
    ,min(c.claimsfromdate) minHemiDate  
    ,(
        select max(c2.claimsfromdate)
            from claims as c2
            where c2.patientid=c.patientid
            group by c2.patientid
     ) as maxClaimsDate

         ,p.drgCode
         ,datediff(dd,min(c.claimsfromdate),max(c.claimsfromdate)) /7 as weeksWithHemi
         INTO #XTable
         from claims as c inner join icdclaims as ci on ci.id=c.id
         inner join tblicd as t on t.icd_id=ci.icd_id
         inner join patient as p on p.patientid=c.patientid
         and p.admissiondate = c.admissiondate
         and p.dischargedate = c.dischargedate
         where t.icdText like '%X%'  and p.statecode='21'
         group by c.patientid, c.admissiondate, p.drgCode

set @myInt=(select count(*) from #XTable)

select p.patientid, count(*)
    from patient as p
    left join #XTable x on x.patientid=p.patientid
    where x.patientid is null
    group by p.patientid

This is the quick and dirty method, but you could obviously declare your table earlier in the script.

share|improve this answer
    
When he moves that though, the second select at the bottom will fail. –  Jon Egerton Aug 17 '12 at 13:52
    
@alex right, i understand that. like i said, i didn't think it would execute. i'm asking for how this could be circumvented. –  wootscootinboogie Aug 17 '12 at 13:52
    
Ah, I get you now. That's because a CTE will be consumed by the next SELECT statement. In this case I would use a temporary table. –  XN16 Aug 17 '12 at 13:55

A CTE may be plural. It doesn't solve your stated problem, but it is often clearer to break a complex CTE into several steps, each building on the prior definitions. In this example there is a recursive CTE and a second CTE that computes statistics based on the first. The final SELECT combines the results:

with CTE
  as (
    select 1 as Number
    union all
    select Number + 1
      from CTE
      where Number < 10
    ),
  Summary
  as (
    select Count( 42 ) as HowMany, Min( Number ) as Least, Max( Number ) as Most
      from CTE
    )
  select *
    from CTE cross join
      Summary
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