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I'm doing a relatively simple mysql query:

         SELECT g.id FROM myTable g
            WHERE g.timestamp > '0' 
            AND g.userId = '1'
            AND g.foo != '34'
            ORDER BY g.id DESC LIMIT 0, 10

This query returns 0 rows, however if I remove the last condition, i.e change it to:

         SELECT g.id FROM myTable g
            WHERE g.timestamp > '0' 
            AND g.userId = '1'
            ORDER BY g.id DESC LIMIT 0, 10

That returns 5-6 rows. This is very strange to me, since in all of those rows, the int column foo is set to NULL

What am I doing wrong?

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Comparing something wilh NULL will result in unknown. That is why NULL values have to be compared with the IS operator.

Replace

AND g.repostVia != '34'

with

AND (g.repostVia != '34' or g.repostVia  is null)

or use the NULL-safe equality operator (thanks to eggyal):

AND NOT g.repostVia <=> '34'
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1  
Should be AND (g.repostVia != '34' or g.repostVia is null) –  Andrius Naruševičius Aug 17 '12 at 13:51
    
That's so unintuitive, but it works. Thanks. –  Click Upvote Aug 17 '12 at 13:52
    
@AndriusNaruševičius: Thanks for the hint. Corrected it. –  juergen d Aug 17 '12 at 13:53
2  
Or one can use the NULL-safe equality operator: AND NOT g.repostVia <=> '34' –  eggyal Aug 21 '12 at 10:32
    
@eggyal: Learned something new. Thanks. –  juergen d Aug 21 '12 at 10:40
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The comparison g.repostVia != '34' is FALSE when g.repostVia is NULL because any comparison with NULL will allways be FALSE.

You should make sure that you have covered this case (variable is NULL) in any comparison with NULL-able column.

You can use IS NULL operator:

SELECT g.id FROM myTable g
            WHERE g.timestamp > '0' 
            AND g.userId = '1'
            AND (g.repostVia, != '34' OR g.repostVia IS NULL)
            ORDER BY g.id DESC LIMIT 0, 10

or COALESCE function:

SELECT g.id FROM myTable g
            WHERE g.timestamp > '0' 
            AND g.userId = '1'
            AND COALESCE(g.repostVia, -1) != '34'
            ORDER BY g.id DESC LIMIT 0, 10

I myself prefer COALESCE, because it seems to me that it retains the original meaning of comparison better and as it allows more parameters it is also more flexible.

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Doing the comparison using IS NULL is definitely valid. I want to offer that COALESCE() is often a bit more readable, if you have an invalid value that you can assign. For instance, if g.foo is always positive, then the following would work:

     SELECT g.id FROM myTable g
         WHERE g.timestamp > '0'
          AND g.userId = '1'
         AND coalesce(g.foo, -1) != '34'
         ORDER BY g.id DESC
     LIMIT 0, 10 
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Maybe try <> instead of !=.

0 values are tricky.

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1  
<> and != are equivalent in MySQL. –  ypercube Aug 17 '12 at 13:55
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