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I want to know what is the difference between ./ and ../ when we are giving path. Is it same?

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Re bounty: What detail is missing? –  Quentin Aug 24 '12 at 9:06
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Re change in accepted answer: Why did you accept an answer that doesn't address the question? –  Quentin Aug 24 '12 at 9:06
    
and why not Google this? simple "difference between ./ and ../ paths" search got this awesome article : coffeecup.com/help/articles/absolute-vs-relative-pathslinks –  Anubhav Saini Aug 26 '12 at 5:30

6 Answers 6

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+200

There is no difference between below given example both are same

./myfiles/images

../myfiles/images

This ./myfiles/images is the image folder here, and this ../myfiles/images is the parent directory which is myfiles folder here

So ../myfiles/images is like we want image from the images folder. This ./myfiles/images is the same of image both are get from the image folder here.

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./ and / do not mean the same thing. They will give the same result only when the URI has only one / character between the host name and the query string or fragment id. –  Quentin Aug 24 '12 at 8:55
    
The question is asking about ./ and ../ not ./ and /. –  Quentin Aug 24 '12 at 8:57
    
After edits: You are now talking about the correct set of things. However, The first paragraph is still just plain wrong. The last two paragraphs are incomprehensible. "is the image folder here" — Where is "here"? "the parent directory which is myfiles folder here" — The parent directory of what? "myfiles" is a subdirectory of some unspecified directory. You have no starting point so you can't compare the URIs. –  Quentin Aug 25 '12 at 7:32
    
../ and ./ are same? suppose you are here in here folder. you say, ./boo.jpg it's still in same here folder and boo.jpg is child of here folder; but if you do: ../boo.jpg it's in parent folder, and boo.jpg is now a sibling of here folder. –  Anubhav Saini Aug 26 '12 at 5:27

. is the current directory

.. is the parent directory

So from http://example.com/foo/bar/baz.html:

./x is http://example.com/foo/bar/x

../x is http://example.com/foo/x

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we can access current directory without using ./ so why we use it –  amit Aug 17 '12 at 13:57
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I don't use it. The option exists though. (It is more useful on the *nix command line then in relative URIs). –  Quentin Aug 17 '12 at 13:58
    
+1 maybe also tell them the difference between ./ and / :) –  Anubhav Saini Aug 26 '12 at 5:28

./ is the current directory, ../ is the parent directory of the current directory

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This ./ is the current directory, and this ../ is the parent directory.

So this:../hello.png mean: get hello.png from the parent directory. This ./hello.png is the same of hello.png; both are get from the current directory

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./ reference to your current directory while ../ reference to the parent and so on ../../

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From my understanding ./ is the same directory. ../ traverses backwards through a directory structure.

example: working directory: \drives\letters\numbers

./ is the numbers dir ../ from numbers will take you to letters dir ../../ from numbers will take to the drives dir

and you keep adding ../ to go backwards until you are in the right place.

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