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The past few sites I worked on and primarily event driven using jquery and i usually make my functions as so

function abc() {
    //do stuff
}
abc();

and

function foo() {
    var a = $('.aaa');
    var b = $('.bbb');
    var c = $('.ccc');

    function animal() {
        //do stuff
    }
    animal();

    function pet() {
        //do stuff
    }
    pet();
}
foo();

I know its not the best practice but, im still learning and it seems to work. I just would like to know the way I should handle this for now on.

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closed as not a real question by Quentin, karim79, Maxim Krizhanovsky, dgw, Graviton Aug 23 '12 at 3:03

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2  
This is so... wrong. I'm sorry but What is your question and what do you expect to get from this line var = cat, dog, mouse? except for an error. Also: event driven? there is nothing here to even suggest that you're dealing with events –  Elias Van Ootegem Aug 17 '12 at 13:55
    
why do you have functions in functions? surely if you can declare a function in one function, surely the statements can just go in one function? And where are your ';'s ? javascript just throws errors without them. –  CKKiller Aug 17 '12 at 14:01
1  
@ChristopherKenney Closures and ASI. –  Fabrício Matté Aug 17 '12 at 14:02
    
@EliasVanOotegem just asking the best practices for declaring functions. i fixed the rest to give a better example? –  delboud Aug 17 '12 at 14:07
    
@ChristopherKenney closures, i just found out a better way to make them although would still like to know the best practice. –  delboud Aug 17 '12 at 14:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Actually the code in your example (the first one) is not the best thing you can do if you're defining all these functions in the global scope (like properties/methods of the global object window). I prefer using module pattern http://addyosmani.com/resources/essentialjsdesignpatterns/book/#modulepatternjavascript I recommend you to read the whole book in the upper link. Another thing which is extremely useful - Stoyan Stefanov's JS Patterns book http://www.amazon.com/JavaScript-Patterns-Stoyan-Stefanov/dp/0596806752.

Another alternative of your example (the second one) is self-executing function:

(function () {
   //attaching events and doing all other stuff
}());

Self-executing functions are helping you to do some initialization work when loading the page for first time. You can attach events or/and do another stuff which you should do once. It's preventing you from polluting the global scope and doing init multiple times.

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1  
does using this instead of the way I did it have any advantages or disadvantages? i took a look at the book from addy and most of the patterns went over my head and seemed like overkill for the work I need done. Is it one pattern I should spend some time with over the others? –  delboud Aug 17 '12 at 14:09
1  
Assuming the function isn't executed more than once in the scope, your IIFE is more appropriate indeed. Otherwise, I don't see anything wrong with declaring a function if it's inside another function as it'll be scoped anyway. –  Fabrício Matté Aug 17 '12 at 14:10
1  
@delboud: of course this has advantages: a scope, created by an anonymous function cannot be created again: the closure is absolute. In your example there is nothing preventing me to do foo(); foo(); –  Elias Van Ootegem Aug 17 '12 at 14:12
    
Yes, that's right. Using self-executing functions is useful for attaching events and doing initialization work on the first page load (just once). –  Minko Gechev Aug 17 '12 at 14:12
1  
@delboud: you can have as many anon. funcs as you like. Look at your average jQuery script: $('#id').on('click',function(){/*anon F*/}); all over the place... –  Elias Van Ootegem Aug 17 '12 at 14:27

Read Principles of Writing Consistent, Idiomatic JavaScript. It's a very good style guide for Javascript.

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this is great, bookmarked!! –  delboud Aug 17 '12 at 14:21

I generally go for something like this. Wrap the whole code in a closure and return one namespace object after attaching all required methods and variables onto that one.

var myApp = (function foo() {
    "use strict";
    var myApp = {

        a       : $('.aaa'),
        b       : $('.bbb'),
        c       : $('.ccc'),
        animal  : function () {
            //do stuff
        }
    };

    myApp.pet =  function () {
        //do stuff
    };

    return myApp;
}());


myApp.animal();
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