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In XAML like this:

 <Button Tag="{Bindin Explain}"/>

In ViewModel:

private string explain = "";
public string Explain
{
    get { return explain; }
    set
    {
        if (explain != value)
        {
            explain = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("Explain");
        }
    }
}

But it doesn't work, so I check it from MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.frameworkelement.tag%28v=vs.95%29.aspx

Because the value is string type, it can't be bound by Tag property.

What is the explanation?

XAML Values

  • object* — A Silverlight object or a custom object that supports object element syntax (the backing type must be nonabstract and must support a public default constructor).
  • string — A string value (can be a true string, or input for an object type that supports type conversion from string).

Property Value
Type: System.Object — The intended value. This property has no default value.

Remarks:
Dependency property identifier field: TagProperty

This property is similar to Tag properties in other programming models. Tag is intended to provide a preexisting property location where you can store some basic custom information about any FrameworkElement without requiring you to derive from FrameworkElement or an intermediate class.

Because this property takes an object, a property element usage is required to set the Tag property in XAML to anything other than an object with a type converter, such as a string. Objects used in this manner are typically not within the standard Silverlight XAML namespaces and therefore may require mapping an external namespace in order to be introduced as XAML object elements.

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2  
Are you sure you just didn't mistype the word "binding" ? –  Dmitriy Reznik Aug 17 '12 at 14:07
    
Yes, I am sure, I try to use int type and double type, it works fine, and even you can use like <Button Tag="test"/>. but string type is not allow, please check the msdn link, but I can't understand this:Because this property takes an object, a property element usage is required to set the Tag property in XAML to anything other than an object with a type converter, such as a string. Objects used in this manner are typically not within the standard Silverlight XAML namespaces and therefore may require mapping an external namespace in order to be introduced as XAML object elements. –  user1433185 Aug 17 '12 at 14:11
    
Dimitriy says that you have "Bindin Explain" instead of "Binding Explain". Correct that and double-check in your code, maybe you have a typo there, too –  quetzalcoatl Aug 17 '12 at 14:12
    
yes, that is input mistake, but in XAML it is correct, please check that link, I don't understand this:Because this property takes an object, a property element usage is required to set the Tag property in XAML to anything other than an object with a type converter, such as a string. Objects used in this manner are typically not within the standard Silverlight XAML namespaces and therefore may require mapping an external namespace in order to be introduced as XAML object elements. –  user1433185 Aug 17 '12 at 14:15
    
Please test it in your side, thanks you very much! In msdn it said:A string value (can be a true string, or input for an object type that supports type conversion from string). –  user1433185 Aug 17 '12 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should be able to have a viewmodel property type more-specific than the control requries. And the 'object Tag' is as least specific as possible, so it should accept just anything.

I bet it is because of the typo as the Dimitriy has said. If not, try with adding Mode=OneWay to the binding. I dont recall wheter silverlight has Two or One way by default, but that it can also make a difference sometimes, as two-way bindings has stricter requirements.


EDIT: MSDN says:

Because this property takes an object, a property element usage is required to set the Tag property in XAML to anything other than an object with a type converter, such as a string.

This fragment has a very weird grammar (at least for me, I'm not english-native). The key to understand what it means is in the words: "property element usage". Let me mark the parts of the sentence:

Because this property takes an object // , in XAML , // a property element usage is required // to set the Tag property to // anything other than an // object with a type converter // , such as a string.

They key words are "XAML" and "property element". You see, in XAML there are two grammar constructs to set the properties. First is the 'XML attributes':

<TextBlock Text="my mom has a cat" Foreground="Violet" />

and the second is "XML child elements":

<TextBlock>
    <TextBlock.Text>
        my mom has a cat
    </TextBlock.Text>
    <TextBlock.Foreground>
        Violet
    </TextBlock.Foreground>
</TextBlock>

Typically, the first is in short called by-attribute or by-property, and the second by-property-element. Please not that even if the attributes or child elements contain only text (string!), the XAML parser is smart enough to konw how to convert the values. The Text property is of type String, so it will be given a text directly, while the Foreground is a Brush.. Ever tried in code to set a Foreground or Background or Fill to a Color? You can't do that directly. Instead of Colors.Violet you've had to create i.e. a new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Violet) and assign that to the property. So how about assigning a text "violet"? :) In XAML the parser just silently uses a proper converter, a Brush converter, that translates strings into a proper Brush.

With the Tag property, there's an unfunny thing. It is an object. How can XAML parser know what exact type of object you would like to have? You write "125599". Ok. Is is a Int32? or String? or a hex-RGB-Color?

This is why the MSDN tries to warn you - and fails because the grammar is fuzzy. The XAML will treat all textual values that are set to the Tag as strings. If you want to have it write an Integer, or a Color, you have to say exactly what conversion you would like to run:

xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System"
....
<!-- those two are strings -->
<TextBlock Tag="1255599" />
<TextBlock>
    <TextBlock.Tag>
        115599
    </TextBlock.Tag>
</TextBlock>
....
<!-- those will be read as Int32 -->
<TextBlock Tag="{sys:Int32 1255599}" />
<TextBlock>
    <TextBlock.Tag>
        <sys:Int32>115599</sys:Int32>
    </TextBlock.Tag>
</TextBlock>

In the latter two I order the XAML parser to create objects of type Int32 from System namespace. The text will be thus parsed as integers.

Now, look at those examples:

<!-- I can put any object, right? -->
<TextBlock>
    <TextBlock.Tag>
        <TextBlock Foreground="Green">
           haha
        </TextBlock>
    </TextBlock.Tag>
</TextBlock>

<!-- I can put any object, right? -->
<TextBlock>
    <TextBlock.Tag>
        <MyClass>
              what happens to this text?
        </MyClass>
    </TextBlock.Tag>
</TextBlock>

Weird? but hey, Tag can take any object. In the first one, I order the XAML parser to create a textblock, set the text and color, and put such object it as a Tag value - everything is clear. But look at the second. What happens here? How the inner text is converted is translated into "MyClass"?

The problem is, that nobody knows. Well, almost. If the MyClass is Int32, then a string-to-int converter fires up, because the Int32 has a TYPE CONVERTER registered somewhere inside the .Net framework.. If MyClass is a TextBlock - the inner text is set to TextProperty, because the TextBlock has a DEFAULT PROPERTY registered somewhere in the .Net framework. And a MyClass? We do not know, and the compiler will complain, unles it has a similar thing registered somewhere in its own source code.

Please look at the last four examples. Please observe how I could assign an Int32 both inline and via "verbose" syntax. This is because the Int32 has a type converter associated and thus the Int32 tells the framework how to convert a string into Int32. Please see that for TextBlocks and for MyCLass I could not do that!! I cannot set a Tag property to a object of class "List" or "Grid" or "MyClass", because they have no type converters associated. The framework would see an expression Tag="{abc:MyClass mom has a cat}" but it would not have a clue how to convert a "mom has a cat" into a "MyClass".

I hope that now:

Because this property takes an object // , in XAML , // a property element usage is required // to set the Tag property to // anything other than an // object with a type converter // , such as a string.

is a little clearer: In XAML, if you want to assign an object that has no type converters associated, you must use the wide property-assignement syntax and specify the object constrction explicitely. But, if an object has a type converter, a string is such object, then you can assign it via brief attribute syntax.

disclaimer: Please note that I have not run any of the above codes. There may be minor bugs, the classes may be ill-chosen and may not work, but the general mechanisms are OK. Drop me a note if something is not.

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In MSDN it said:Because this property takes an object, a property element usage is required to set the Tag property in XAML to anything other than an object with a type converter, such as a string. –  user1433185 Aug 17 '12 at 14:23
    
Could you please explain this for me ? thanks.that means string type is not allowed, right? I have tried many times. string type can't be binded, no any input mistake. –  user1433185 Aug 17 '12 at 14:23
    
I've desribed the meaning in detail, see the new version –  quetzalcoatl Aug 17 '12 at 19:26
    
thank you very much!I got it. –  user1433185 Sep 6 '12 at 14:40

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