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I've got this code:

def time24hr(tstr):

    if ('a' and ':') in tstr:
        if tstr[:2] == '12':
            tstr = tstr.replace('12', '00').replace(':','').replace('am','hr')
            return tstr

        elif len(tstr[:tstr.find(':')]) < 2:
        # If length of string's 'tstr' slice (that ends before string ':') is less than 2
            tstr = tstr.replace(tstr[:tstr.find(':')],'0' + tstr[:tstr.find(':')]).replace(':', '').replace('am','hr')
            # Replace one-character string with combination of '0' and this one-character string. Then remove colon, by replacing it with lack of characters and replace 'am' string with 'hr'.
            return tstr

        else:
            tstr = tstr.replace(':', '').replace('am', 'hr')
            return tstr

    elif ('p' and ':') in tstr:
        tstr = tstr.replace(':', '').replace('pm', 'hr')
        return tstr

    else:
        return "Time format unknown. Type correct time."

When i execute this code print time24hr('12:34am') it returns 0034hr string as it should. It works also for this print time24hr('2:59am'), returns 0259hr. But when i type string with 12 in it, it automatically omits this part of code if ('a' and ':') in tstr: or this elif ('p' and ':') in tstr: and proceeds to this part:

if tstr[:2] == '12':
    tstr = tstr.replace('12', '00').replace(':','').replace('am','hr')
    return tstr

So no matter if i type 12:15am or 12:15pm, this code if finds the 12 in string, starts doing this above code. print time24hr('12:15pm') returns 0015pm but should return 0015hr and only for strings with am in it. Else, don't change 12 to 00 and return i.e. 1244hr for 12:44pm.

My question is, why those logical check if ('a' and ':') in tstr: and elif ('p' and ':') in tstr: aren't working? This code is meant to be a solution for this quiz -> http://www.pyschools.com/quiz/view_question/s3-q8

==================================================================================

Thanks for helping me, with logical operations.

Also, i've completed above mentioned quiz and here's working code:

def time24hr(tstr):

    if (len(tstr[:tstr.find(':')]) == 2) and (tstr[0] == '0'):
        tstr = tstr.replace(tstr[0], '')

    if ('a' in tstr) and (':' in tstr):
        if tstr[:2] == '12':
            tstr = tstr.replace('12', '00').replace(':', '').replace('am', 'hr')
            return tstr

        elif len(tstr[:tstr.find(':')]) < 2:
        # If length of string's 'tstr' slice (that ends before string ':') is less than 2
            tstr = tstr.replace(tstr[:tstr.find(':')], '0' + tstr[:tstr.find(':')]).replace(':', '').replace('am', 'hr')
            # Replace one-character string with combination of '0' and this one-character string. Then remove colon, by replacing it with lack of characters and replace 'am' string with 'hr'.
            return tstr

        else:
            tstr = tstr.replace(':', '').replace('am', 'hr')
            return tstr

    elif ('p' in tstr) and (':' in tstr):
        if tstr[:2] == '12':
            tstr = tstr.replace(':', '').replace('pm', 'hr')
            return tstr

        elif len(tstr[:tstr.find(':')]) < 2:
            PmDict = {'0':'12','1':'13', '2':'14', '3':'15', '4':'16', '5':'17', '6':'18', '7':'19', '8':'20', '9':'21', '10':'22', '11':'23'}
            tstr = tstr.replace(tstr[:tstr.find(':')], PmDict[tstr[:tstr.find(':')]]).replace(':', '').replace('pm', 'hr')
            # Replace every "number" (which is string literally) with it's corresponding "number" in 24HR format, found in 'PmDict' dictionary. Then, as in above cases, remove colon ':' by replacing it with lack of character or space and then replace 'pm' with 'hr'
            return tstr

    else:
        return "Time format unknown. Type correct time."

I hadn't written this code according to the KISS rule, as you can see - 'cause it's a bit complicated, but works quite well IMO.

It can be tested here -> http://doc.pyschools.com/console

Cheers everyone and thanks for helping :)

share|improve this question
    
Because this is not how the and operator works. It evaluates its operands and returns the one that determines the final result. 'a' and ':' is ':' because both ('a' and ':') evaluate to True. 0 and 'foo' would result in 0 because 0 evaluates to False. The result is then passed to the in operator, so you get ':' in tstr. –  Felix Kling Aug 17 '12 at 14:18
    
just a slight clarifcation to @FelixKling's comment : It doesn't necessarily evaluate both operands. It only evaluates the right operand if the left operand is true-like. (This is referred to as short circuit evaluation) –  mgilson Aug 17 '12 at 14:23

4 Answers 4

if ('a' and ':') in tstr:

is same as

if ':' in tstr:

hope this gives you insight to what problems seems to be.

probably replace with

if 'a' in tstr and ':' in tstr:
share|improve this answer
    
Why does 'a' and ':' evaluate to :? –  Waleed Khan Aug 17 '12 at 14:17
1  
@arxanas -- because non-empty strings are true-like. The and operator looks at the left object and asks -- Is this true-like? If it isn't, it returns the left object. If the left object is true-like, it returns the right object. –  mgilson Aug 17 '12 at 14:19
    
@arxanas Similarly 'a' or ':' evaluates to 'a'. –  Andy Hayden Aug 17 '12 at 14:20
    
Yeah, that's it. Thanks! –  spaffy Aug 17 '12 at 14:21
    
if this works then mark it as answer, then question will be marked as solved –  Vaibhav Mishra Aug 17 '12 at 16:29

Well your first check:

('a' and ':') in tstr

is only really checking to see if ':' is in tstr. Exactly why this is, I am not sure but if you run the ('a' and ':') statement in interactive Python, you will see that it returns ':'.

Your second check has the same error.

Consider using

if ':' in tstr and 'a' in tstr:

and

elif 'p' in tstr and ':' in tstr:

Unfortunately Python can only be so English-like :)

share|improve this answer

Your main problem is that your code checking for substring containment is incorrect: you are using in improperly. When you write

if ('a' and ':') in tstr:

It evaluates ('a' and ':') first to get : and then checks if ':' in tstr. That's why the first if block keeps evaluating to true. This happens because and is a boolean operation, and x and y is equivalent to x if bool(x) else y. This expression is evaluated before you even get to the in check.

You would replace that code with

if ('a' in tstr) and (':' in tstr)

(and do similarly for the other check)

share|improve this answer

You can generalize this testing for existence of multiple elements using all:

if all(ch in tstr for ch in 'a:'):
    etc...
share|improve this answer

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