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I try to replace directory part of file fullname in Perl. Something like: got filename 'D:\Texts1\text1' in directory 'D:\Texts1', want to replace it with 'D:\Texts2' and then filename will be 'D:\Texts2\text1'.

I try this code:

$filename = 'D:\Texts1\text1';
$i = 'D:\Texts1';
$o = 'D:\Texts2';
$filename =~ s'$i'$o'g;

And it does not take effect. $filename doesn't changes. I tried to use something like

$i = quotemeta('D:\Texts1');

but it also has not took effect.

share|improve this question
    
Thank you all! My mistake was that I try to use quotemeta to $i and $o at one time. But only for $i it is needed. – Valentin P. Aug 17 '12 at 14:30
    
Actually the single quotes were also a problem--see my answer. You probably changed from single quotes to another delimiter at some point, and this also helped fix it. – dan1111 Aug 17 '12 at 14:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

this doesn't interpolate

$filename =~ s'$i'$o'g;

try using / instead of ', like this:

$filename =~ s/$i/$o/g;

that should work. ' prevents string interpolation, so the variable names appear as string literals. Also, make sure to use the quotemeta like you were doing before.

share|improve this answer
    
They should use forward slashes or escape their backslashes as well. – squiguy Aug 17 '12 at 14:21
1  
The s can be followed by any character, including a single quote, and that becomes the delimiter for the regex. Try: perl -p -e "s'a'b'g" and type some a's in the input. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 17 '12 at 14:25
    
Technically, you're right, but it's really bad practice... try running this, then this, and tell me which one works.... – John Corbett Aug 17 '12 at 14:31
2  
It is because of the special meaning of single quotes in this context: they prevent variable interpolation. – dan1111 Aug 17 '12 at 14:52
2  
+1 @dan1111, I just read it here: If "'" is used as the delimiter, no interpolation is done – Baiyan Huang Aug 17 '12 at 14:55

The \ in D:\Texts1 is the problem. You need to escape this metacharacter. For this purpose, the string should be wrapped by \Q and \E.

$filename =~ s/\Q$i\E/$o/g;
share|improve this answer
    
the quotemeta does just that, he said he tried that – John Corbett Aug 17 '12 at 14:21
    
You know why escape expicitly doesn't work? $i = 'D:\\Texts'? – Baiyan Huang Aug 17 '12 at 14:59
    
lzprgmr: They are essentially the same: perl -E 'say "OK" if q{a\b} eq q{a\\b}' – Alan Haggai Alavi Aug 17 '12 at 15:28

There are several valid answers here, I would like to compile a comprehensive answer along with mine to make this post easier to read:

Root Cause

$i = 'D:\Texts1';

when used as a regex pattern, "\" should be escaped - what the regex engine want is some ultimate format like: D:\\Texts1. So this doesn't work, however, there are at least 4 different ways to build this format as listed below.

Also to notice, when ' is used as delimiter for match or substitution statement, variable interpolation will be disabled, which renders $filename =~ s'$i'$o'g; almost useless. so first step, change it to use / or {}

Solution 1

use quotemeta, this will effectively escape the "\":

$filename = 'D:\Texts1\text1';
$i = quotemeta('D:\Texts1');
$o = 'D:\Texts2';
$filename =~ s/$i/$o/g;

Solution 2

use \Q .. \E, which has similar effects as quotemeta:

$filename = 'D:\Texts1\text1';
$i = 'D:\Texts1';
$o = 'D:\Texts2';
$filename =~ s/\Q$i\E/$o/g; # or s/\Q$i/$o/g also works

Solution 3

escape the "\" in the string explicitly, and use qr to quote the string as regex pattern.

$filename = 'D:\Texts1\text1';
$i = qr 'D:\\Texts1';
$o = 'D:\Texts2';
$filename =~ s/$i/$o/g;

Solution 4

escape to the extent that the string is ready for regex:

$filename = 'D:\Texts1\text1';
$i = 'D:\\\\Texts1';
$o = 'D:\Texts2';
$filename =~ s/$i/$o/g;
share|improve this answer

you need to add \Q:

$filename =~s{\Q$i}{$o};
share|improve this answer
    
I guess you mean \Q...\E – Baiyan Huang Aug 17 '12 at 14:37
    
There's only one variable. \E is not necessary but I guess it would be better style – shi Aug 17 '12 at 14:40

In fact you are experiencing a combination of two problems:

  • Single quotes, while valid as a regexp delimiter, have a special meaning: they disable variable interpolation. Thus you are searching your string for the literal pattern $i (if you have warnings enabled, you get a clue to this--it tells you that the variables $i and $o are only used once in your program).
  • As others have pointed out, you also need the \Q...\E construct or quotemeta() in order to avoid interpreting the special characters in your variable as regexp operators.
share|improve this answer

Updated code

use strict;
use warnings qw/all/;

my $filename = 'D:\Texts1\text1';
my $i = 'D:\\Texts1';
my $o = 'D:\\Texts2';
$filename =~ s/\Q$i\E/$o/;

print $filename;

Be happy!

share|improve this answer
1  
Do you really want a regex for the replacement text? I suspect not. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 17 '12 at 14:23
    
the quotes in the search and replace are invalid, and $o should be q, not qr, it's not a regex – John Corbett Aug 17 '12 at 14:24
    
@JohnCorbett you know why $i=qr 'D:\\Texts1' works while $i= 'D:\\Texts1' won't work? we just add the escape ourselves why compared using quotemeta. – Baiyan Huang Aug 17 '12 at 14:39
    
The code will not work as backslashes are escaped to \\ in regular expression pattern, after using \Q and \E to escape backslashes in pattern – Alex Yaroshevich Aug 17 '12 at 14:41

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