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I need to start a loop from an event and then stop it from another event. My idea was to call the function startDequeuing() when I press the button so that a thread with the loop start and then to terminate this loop putting "dequeuing" variable at false from the function stopDequeuing().

It's the first time I use thread, the program locks when I start the loop I think because the variable 'dequeuing' is locked and inaccessible from outside the thread, am I correct?

How can I solve this problem??

Here there is some code:

void CameraManager::startDequeuing(){
    dequeuing = true;
    std::thread dequeueThread(&CameraManager::dequeueLoop, this);
    dequeueThread.join();
}

void CameraManager::stopDequeuing(){
    dequeuing = false;
}

void *CameraManager::dequeueLoop(){
    while(dequeuing){
        highSpeedCamera->dequeue();
        highSpeedCamera->enqueue();
    }
}
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2  
No, please do not use volatile, when it's up to multithreading. It might work, but it's never needed in correctly written multithreaded applications. The problem here is most likely, that stopDequeuing() never gets called, because startDequeing() blocks on join(). –  Torsten Robitzki Aug 17 '12 at 14:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The whole point of using threads is to get more than one function running in parallel. Here:

std::thread dequeueThread(&CameraManager::dequeueLoop, this);
dequeueThread.join();

You start a second thread and put the first thread to sleep, waiting for the spawned thread to return. So you still have just one thread running. If you have so kind of GUI event loop, you might lock for a possibility to add a callback that will get called, when ever that event loop is empty. This might enable you to do what you want without using threads at all.

A solution might look like this:

void CameraManager::startDequeuing(){
    dequeuing = true;
    dequeueThread = std::thread(&CameraManager::dequeueLoop, this);
}

void CameraManager::stopDequeuing(){
    {
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock( mutex );
        dequeuing = false;
    }
    dequeueThread.join();
}

bool CameraManager::keepOnDequeuing()
{
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock( mutex );
    return dequeuing;
}

void *CameraManager::dequeueLoop(){
    while( keepOnDequeuing() ){
        highSpeedCamera->dequeue();
        highSpeedCamera->enqueue();
    }
}
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You're missing a lock in startDequeing - and if you have locks in start and stop, why add keepOnDequeuing just for dequeueLoop instead of just another lock in there? Also, your thread is still local to startDequeuing's scope?! –  Dave Aug 17 '12 at 15:01
    
@Dave having no mutex locked before starting the thread is ok, because the thread is guarantied to see changes made to memory before the thread is started. I've added keepOnDequeuing() to make the mutex.lock(); read flag; mutex.unlock() more readable. Try to write dequeueLoop() without that helper and you will see what I mean ;-) The lock_guard locks the mutex in it's c'tor and unlocks it in it's d'tor, so when the local variable named lock goes out of scope, the mutex is unlocked(). –  Torsten Robitzki Aug 17 '12 at 15:05
    
You would need the mutex if you weren't creating a thread that dies immediately. And, I know what lock_guard does, I didn't ask. –  Dave Aug 17 '12 at 15:10
    
@Dave, there is no thread created, that dies immediately. A temporary thread variable just means, that you can't point to that thread anymore, so you can't join() it for example. But you are right, dequeueThread have to have a member variable and the starting the thread should read `dequeueThread = std::thread(&CameraManager::dequeueLoop, this);' –  Torsten Robitzki Aug 17 '12 at 15:13
    
Thank you all! i first implemented the solution proposed by Torsten of course declaring 'dequeueThread' a class variable and it worked nicely! Now as suggested by Pete Becker i'm trying atomic bool to gain in performance. –  Gabriele Gambotto Aug 17 '12 at 21:47

Your program deadlocks because join() will block until your thread function completes; And it will never complete at that point because it's effectively executing while(true).

You want dequeueThread to be a member of your class. Why would you want it to survive only for the scope of startDequeuing?

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Define dequeing as an atomic bool:

#include <atomic>
std::atomic_bool dequeing = false;

It's much faster than using a mutex and gets you the same synchronization.

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Forgot to mention: std::atomic_bool can also be spelled std::atomic<bool>. –  Pete Becker Aug 17 '12 at 21:10

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