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This might be very basic question but I was wondering why can't I assign nil as NSDictionary value? I have following statement many places in my code. If [q objectForKey:@"text"] is nil then App is crashing.

NSMutableDictionary *dict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithCapacity:2];
[dict setObject:[q objectForKey:@"text"] forKey:@"text"];

I have to check everywhere for the nil before assigning it to dictionary. Is this the only correct way of doing? Am I missing something obvious?

if([q objectForKey:@"text"] != nil)
    [dict setObject:[q objectForKey:@"text"] forKey:@"text"];
else
    [dict setObject:@"" forKey:@"text"];
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you need to check everytime .. not so good but a should do.. –  iremk Aug 17 '12 at 15:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 26 down vote accepted

It wants an actual object... use NSNull

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This looks great. When I set NSNull, the condition if([q objectForKey:@"text"] == nil) will be true or do I have to use if([q objectForKey:@"text"] == NSNull)? Thanks. –  AppleDeveloper Aug 17 '12 at 15:16
    
I didn't knew about this ... thanks :) –  Kunal Balani Aug 17 '12 at 15:17
2  
@AppleDeveloper it won't be true, you will have to check against [NSNull null] –  Peter Pajchl Aug 17 '12 at 15:21
    
Thanks @peter so I will need to use two different conditions? if([q objectForKey:@"text"] == nil) to check if key is exists or not and if([q objectForKey:@"text"] == [NSNull null]) to check if key has null value? –  AppleDeveloper Aug 17 '12 at 15:24
2  
@AppleDeveloper since you can't store nil in NSDictionary, checking for it is obsolete as it can't ever happen. So, no, don't check for nil, only check for [NSNull null]. –  Peter Pajchl Aug 18 '12 at 11:31

You can set a nil value using setValue:forKey but it removes the key.

If you want to be able to set a key to nil you could use setValue:forKey: which will remove the key if you set it to nil (quote from documentation below). Note the Value instead of Object.

setValue:forKey:

Adds a given key-value pair to the dictionary.

...
Discussion

This method adds value and key to the dictionary using setObject:forKey:, unless value is nil in which case the method instead attempts to remove key using removeObjectForKey:.

When you later try and get the object using objectForKey: for the key that you removed by setting it to nil you will get nil back (quote from documentation below).

Return value:

The value associated with aKey, or nil if no value is associated with aKey.

Note: The key will not actually be present in the dictionary so it won't be obtained using allKeys; or be enumerated over.

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2  
Hi David, Thanks for the useful info but I read on Apple documents that you use setValue only for KVO and for normal key-value pair, you should always use setObject! Isn't that true? –  AppleDeveloper Aug 17 '12 at 15:21
3  
@AppleDeveloper As far as I know, dictionaries have their own setValue implementation. The NSMutableDictionary documentation (linked in my answer) says nothing about not using it: "setValue:forKey: Adds a given key-value pair to the dictionary. ... Discussion This method adds value and key to the dictionary using setObject:forKey:, unless value is nil in which case the method instead attempts to remove key using removeObjectForKey:." –  David Rönnqvist Aug 17 '12 at 15:25

My friend using nil as marker is a sign of bad programming . nil is reserved for some diffrent purpose .

if([q objectForKey:@"text"] != nil)
    [dict setObject:[q objectForKey:@"text"] forKey:@"text"];
else
    [dict removeObjectforKey:@"text"]; // this will do nothing if key does not exsist.

//by default for all the keys the value is nil and you are trying to override this behavior. going against the language rules will always get you in trouble .

to check just use

if([dict objectforKey:@"text"] !=nil){} // this will work becuase default value is nil 
itself 
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I know that but a I had to do this to set default value for the key! Can you just create key without assigning value? –  AppleDeveloper Aug 17 '12 at 15:18
    
@AppleDeveloper Please explain what you would gain by having a key without a value... –  David Rönnqvist Aug 17 '12 at 15:19
1  
The short ans is no and long ans is Noooooooooooooo. –  Kunal Balani Aug 17 '12 at 15:20
    
@DavidRönnqvist sorry I know it's not possible but I was little sarcastic there! I am building 100s of key-value pair where some of them have values and some are missing and will be filled by user. I am generating dynamic UI controls so still if particular key doesn't have an answer/default value,I need to store that key for future reference and assign the value later on. –  AppleDeveloper Aug 17 '12 at 15:27
    
@AppleDeveloper we all hinting you that you have a wrong design . Insert key value when you have both (this will save you memory too) . I dont know what your context is but you can always have a better solution than inserting nil value . –  Kunal Balani Aug 17 '12 at 15:31

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