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Is it possible to require implementations of an interface to override Object methods?

For example, if I have an interface that will commonly be used as keys in HashMaps, I may want to require all implementations of that interface to override the hashCode() and equals() methods.

However, if I have the following interface...:

public interface MyInterface(){
  @Override
  public int hashCode();

  @Override
  public boolean equals(Object o);
}

...the following implementation compiles:

public class MyImplementation(){
}

It does not require a method to override hashCode() or equals(), as it inherits these methods from Object.

One approach could be to switch to using an abstract class instead of an interface:

public abstract class MyAbstractClass(){
  @Override
  public abstract int hashCode();

  @Override
  public abstract boolean equals(Object o);
}

Then any class that extends this abstract class is required to override hashCode() and equals():

// doesn't compile - requires implementation of hashCode() and equals()
public class MyClass extends MyAbstractClass {
}

// does compile
public class MyClass extends MyAbstractClass {
  @Override
  public int hashCode(){
    // calculate hashcode
  }

  @Override
  public boolean equals(Object o){
    // check equality
  }
}

My supposition is that the difference between these is that an abstract class is an Object, so it's below Object in the hierarchy, so all extensions are required to meet the contract in the abstract class. Whereas, interfaces are not Objects, so don't sit in the hierarchy, but any implementation of an interface must be an Object, at which point it inherits the Object methods, and thus satisfies the interface 'contract'.

However, back to my original question... is there a way to require implementations of an interface to override Object methods?

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1  
No, the contract is satisfied by the first sub-class. If a preceding class to the implementing class implements all interface's methods then the 'contract' has been satisfied. –  Mitch Connor Aug 17 '12 at 16:13
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no way to accomplish what you want using only interfaces.

An alternative (and possibly clearer) way to do this by forcing the use of an abstract base class is as follows:

public abstract class MyAbstractClass {
  @Override public final int hashCode() { return hashCodeImpl(); }
  @Override public final boolean equals(Object o) { return equalsImpl(o); }

  protected abstract int hashCodeImpl();
  protected abstract boolean equalsImpl(Object o);
}
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Is there any reason to prefer an abstract class like that over the abstract class in my original question? –  amaidment Aug 17 '12 at 22:32
    
@amaidment - i honestly didn't realize you could override a concrete method and make it abstract again (i assumed your example wouldn't compile). a quick test confirms that it does compile, but it still seems very weird to me. –  jtahlborn Aug 18 '12 at 0:02
    
I would suggest that this is weaker than the approach in my question - if I have another abstract class that extends your MyAbstractClass and implements hashCodeImpl() and equalsImpl(), and then create implementations of that abstract class - I can then override the hashCode() and equals() methods by either a) overriding the actual hashCode() and equals() methods or b) by overriding the hashCodeImpl() and equalsImpl() methods. That seems like poor design to me. –  amaidment Aug 18 '12 at 8:41
    
@amaidment - no, you cannot as i made the equals() and hashCode() methods final so they cannot be overridden by any other subclass. –  jtahlborn Aug 18 '12 at 12:52
    
Ah - very good. Hadn't spotted that in your answer. –  amaidment Aug 18 '12 at 19:24
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No. Java can't express that requirement. How an abstract class like this?

public abstract class MyAbstractClass(){
  @Override
  public int hashCode(){
    return myOverrideHashCode();
  }

  @Override
  public boolean equals(){
    return myOverrideEquals();
  }

  protected abstract int myOverrideHashCode();

  protected abstract booleans myOverrideEquals();
}
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