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I have a problem with the followingspring context configuration file:

...
   <context:property-override location="classpath:query_1.properties" />
        <bean
            class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
            <property name="locations" value="classpath:query_2.properties" />
        </bean>
....

The problem is that the properties in the file "query_2.properties" cannot be found. The exception I get ist he following one:

Exception in thread "main" org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanDefinitionStoreException. Could not resolve placeholder...

Now my question: is it possible that the combination of context:property-override and PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer does make no sense? Can anyone explain me in simple words what is the difference between both? Any help would be appreciated.

Thx. Horace

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1 Answer 1

Property placeholders, normally defined using a <context:property-placeholder location=../> resolves the placeholders in bean definitions:

for eg.

<bean name="myclass" class="MyClass">
    <property name="prop1" value="${prop1val}/>
</bean>

if the location specified with property placeholder has a property with name prop1val:

prop1val=aval

then it will be replaced in the bean myclass.

PrpertyOverrideConfigurer defined using <context:property-override location="classpath:query_1.properties" /> on the other is like a push mechanism, the property is of the form beanname.property and it would push this property into the bean with name beanname.

For eg. for the above case if the location had a property of:

myclass.prop1=aval

then it would inject in prop1 of myclass bean

The exception you are getting simply indicates that it is not able to find query_2.properties file, I doubt if it is any other configuration issue.

On which one will take effect if both are defined, I think the last one will the one to take effect.

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