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The Knockout mapping plugin documentation has a section entitled "Uniquely identifying objects using “keys”". This describes how to update part of an object and then only update that part of the display rather than completely replacing the display of all properties of a partially-modified object. That all works splendidly in their simple example, which I have slightly modified here to make my question more clear. My modifications were to:

  1. Replace the object with a corrected name after a 2 second delay.

  2. Highlight the unchanging part of the display, so you can see that it is actually not replaced when the update happens.

1. Simple object (jsFiddle)

<h1 data-bind="text: name"></h1>
<ul data-bind="foreach: children">
    <li><span class="id" data-bind="text: id"></span> <span data-bind="text: name"></span></li>
</ul>

<script>
var data = {
    name: 'Scot',
    children: [
        {id : 1, name : 'Alicw'}
    ]
};
var mapping = {
    children: {
        key: function(data) {
            console.log(data);
            return ko.utils.unwrapObservable(data.id);
        }
    }
};
var viewModel = ko.mapping.fromJS(data, mapping);
ko.applyBindings(viewModel);

var range = document.createRange();
range.selectNode(document.getElementsByClassName("id")[0]);
window.getSelection().addRange(range);

setTimeout(function () {
    var data = {
        name: 'Scott',
        children: [
            {id : 1, name : 'Alice'}
        ]
    };
    ko.mapping.fromJS(data, viewModel);
}, 2000);
</script>

But what isn't clear to me is how I would achieve the same behavior for a more complex nested data structure. In the following example, I took the above code and wrapped the data in a list. I would like this to behave the same as above, but it doesn't. The whole display is redone because of the change in one property. You can see this because, unlike the above example, the highlighting is lost after the data is updated.

2. More complex nested object (jsFiddle)

<!-- ko foreach: parents -->
    <h1 data-bind="text: name"></h1>
    <ul data-bind="foreach: children">
        <li><span class="id" data-bind="text: id"></span> <span data-bind="text: name"></span></li>
    </ul>
<!-- /ko -->

<script>
var data = {
    parents: [
        {
            name: 'Scot',
            children: [
                {id : 1, name : 'Alicw'}
            ]
        }
    ]
};
var mapping = {
    children: {
        key: function(data) {
            console.log(data);
            return ko.utils.unwrapObservable(data.id);
        }
    }
};
var viewModel = ko.mapping.fromJS(data, mapping);
ko.applyBindings(viewModel);

var range = document.createRange();
range.selectNode(document.getElementsByClassName("id")[0]);
window.getSelection().addRange(range);

setTimeout(function () {
    var data = {
        parents: [
            {
                name: 'Scott',
                children: [
                    {id : 1, name : 'Alice'}
                ]
            }
        ]
    };
    ko.mapping.fromJS(data, viewModel);
}, 2000);
</script>

So basically what I'm asking is, how can I make the second example work like the first, given the more nested data structure? You can assume that ids are unique for each child (so if I added another parent besides Scott, his children would start with id=2, etc.).

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Interesting observation there and nice write-up. It appears to work if you define a key on the parent as well as the child. Try this fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/8QJe7/6/

It defines instantiable view model functions for the parents and children, where the parent constructor does its child mappings.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that does seem to work, although I wish there was a simpler and more intuitive way, as it seems strange to have to define the key for the parent and the child even though it's only used for the child - any idea why that is? Also, do you know if there would be a substantial performance penalty for calling ko.mapping.fromJS multiple times? I guess it might depend on the context, whether it make sense to do that or to naively update everything? –  dumbmatter Aug 19 '12 at 23:41
1  
I haven't delved into the innards of the mapping plugin but I presume there's a good reason why it needs to be able to identify the child's parent as it works through the hierarchy of objects and DOM elements. Re performance - my view model hierarchy is about 6 levels deep, all implemented as instantiable functions which create their children with keys like in my fiddle. The number of siblings at each level is highly variable but it performs very smoothly doing mapping updates from the top down within realistic usage parameters for my application. Every app will be different. –  Tom Hall Aug 20 '12 at 0:10
1  
I did actually start off doing my own mapping process, for various complicated reasons - but eventually I gave up and re-thought my application logic instead, to utilize the mapping plugin. I found that doing large robust updates of nested objects and arrays by unique keys is not a trivial thing to do, and they've done a pretty good job with that plugin I reckon. –  Tom Hall Aug 20 '12 at 0:14

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