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I have some code here that works as expected when I install it / run it on my own computer, Windows 7, but when I run it on other servers (2003 and 2008) it does not. The code is from a .NET4 WCF Service Library that I use in a Windows service. Here it is, simpllified.

public void monitorQueueAndDoStuff() {
  MonitorRetryQueue();
  MonitorMainQueue();                
}

private void MonitorMainQueue() {
  Log.Info("MonitorMainQueue called");
  Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
  {
    Log.Info("new thread monitoring queue");
    // ...NMS stuff

        while (!stopped) {
          ITextMessage mess = null;
            mess = blockingMessageCollection.Take();
            sendToQueue(mess);
        }
      }
    }
  });
}


private void MonitorRetryQueue() {
  Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
  {
    //...NMS stuff
        consumer.Listener += new MessageListener(OnRetryErrorMessage);
        Log.Info("new thread monitoring second queue");

        //need to be constantly up for the consumer to hang around
        while (!stopped) {
          Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
      }
    }
      });
}

The threads should enter loops to do some work. The main one blocks on a BlockingCollection. Now, it creates both tasks but it only enters the second, it never prints "new thread monitoring queue" in the log. I cannot grasp why not. I tried Remote Debugging but as it never enters the code I couldn't see anything of value.

I haven't found anything that would change the behavior of the code on the deployed server. Anyone here might have a clue? Any settings in the Visual Studio project?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sometimes this kind of behaviour is an indication of an overloaded ThreadPool.

Seeing as these are long running/blocking tasks, they should not be scheduled to run in the ThreadPool, which is where Task.Factory.StartNew will be sending them using the default TaskScheduler.

IMO, Task.Factory.StartNew is probably not best suited to this, and you'd be better off spinning up your own threads to run these loops.

ThreadStart action=()=>{
    //do your thing
};
Thread thread=new Thread(action){IsBackground=true};
thread.Start();
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I'd have to agree, not necessarily because the ThreadPool is overloaded, but more that Tasks and the thread pool are for use by things that aren't going to run 'forever' (arbitrary amount of time) like this, but instead things that will have some finite amount of time needed to complete an action. When you have some processing loop that you want to run 'forever' (until it's stopped), then that's a good fit for a dedicated background thread (much like how some apps/frameworks will have a dedicated loop for pumping messages) –  James Manning Aug 17 '12 at 18:50
    
Thanks, I had expected that this might help, but I'm afraid it behaved the same with ThreadStart. Good to know that Task.Factory.StartNew isn't suited though. –  ejpb Aug 20 '12 at 10:33
1  
Well, I found it, it had nothing to do with these methods. It was a dll that it needed to have, that I hadn't set to copy local. I didn't see any messages about it until I tried a command line version. I set your answer as correct. –  ejpb Aug 22 '12 at 16:10
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Do any log messages get printed in the log? Do you see "MonitorMainQueue called" get printed? How do you know the second Task is started but not the first? Could it be a permission issue with creating/writing to the log file?

Edit: Additionally, in response to what @spender said about long running tasks, there is an overload to start the task with that option.

Task.Factory.StartNew(MonitorMainQueue, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

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The bulk of this answer should be a comment to the original question. –  spender Aug 17 '12 at 17:26
    
I agree but I don't have enough reputation points to post a comment. :) –  Paccc Aug 17 '12 at 17:28
    
Yes, "MonitorMainQueue called" is printed in the log, but then nothing more from that thread, only the other (I had removed the log statement in the second thread from my example, I put it back now). Both write to the same log so that shouldn't matter. On my system the log has all three statements. I tried TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning without any difference. –  ejpb Aug 20 '12 at 10:24
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