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I have the following function defined in my .vimrc. For a given file, this should change the beginning of each line from the 3rd line onwards with the line number.

function Foo()
   3,$ s/^/      /g
   3
   let i=1 | ,$ g/^/ s//\=i/ | let i+=1
   1
endfunction

However, I want to change the function, so that it will accept one argument. It will insert that word, so that the function will look something as follows:

function Foo(chr)
   3,$ s/^/      /g
   3
   let i=1 | ,$ g/^/ s//\=i/ | let i+=1
   1
   3,$ s/^/chr        /g
endfunction

EDIT: Providing an example.

My input file looks something like this:

some text1
some text 2
0000
0000
0001
0002

I want to make the file look as follows:

sm1     1        0000
sm1     2        0000
sm1     3        0001
.
.

So i want to be able to give that "sm1" as a argument to the function, so that for another file i might want to have "sm2" instead of "sm1".

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You probably don't need a function since

:3,$s/^/chr        /

should work. However, if you wanted to make a command for this you could make one like this:

command! -nargs=1 Example 3,$s/^/<args>        /

This would allow you to use :Example chr to insert chr at the beginning of lines 3 and above.

Also, you said that your original function inserts the "line number", but instead it will insert 1 on line 3 and so on. I'm sure you know that you can enable line numbers with :set nu, but if you want to insert line numbers on each line 3 and above you can do:

fun! Foo()
   3,$s/^/\=line('.')."      "
endfun

or if you want to keep your previous functionality, this is more succint:

fun! Foo()
   3,$s/^/\=(line('.')-2)."      "
endfun

If you want to combine all of it into one command you can do

com! -nargs=1 Example 3,$s/^/\="<args>     ".(line('.')-2)."        "

This will give you an :Example <argument> command. So now you can do :Example sm1 like you wanted.

If you want to keep your function as is, to make it work you should use a:chr like this:

function Foo(chr)
   3,$ s/^/      /g
   3
   let i=1 | ,$ g/^/ s//\=i/ | let i+=1
   1
   exe "3,$s/^/".a:chr."        /g"
endfunction
share|improve this answer
    
i like your answer. However, the reason i want my function to accept an argument is because i want to do all the 3 steps with a single call. What i am doing currently is what you have suggested, first create the file with the numbers in the beginning and then replace the beginning with the "chr", but the "chr" is going to be different for different files. –  Sam Aug 20 '12 at 18:00
    
thanks for the edits too! –  Sam Aug 20 '12 at 18:01
    
@Sam Did my answer solve your problem? Is there some other way I can assist? –  Conner Aug 20 '12 at 20:14
    
actually i need to provide the string to be substituted as argument, because that string changes for each file. That way I can call the function with a argument and i will get a file in exact format that i want. If i am not clear may be i should provide an example. –  Sam Aug 21 '12 at 13:07
1  
This solves the problem completely!! Thanks a lot, much appreciated. –  Sam Aug 21 '12 at 14:32

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