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In popular imperative languages, switch statements generally "fall through" to the next level once a case statement has been matched.

Example:

int a = 2;
switch(a)
{
   case 1:
      print "quick ";
   case 2: 
      print "brown ";
   case 3: 
      print "fox ";
      break;
   case 4:
      print "jumped ";
}

would print "brown fox".

However the same code in bash

A=2
case $A in
2)
  echo "QUICK"
  ;&
2)
  echo "BROWN"
  ;&
3)
  echo "FOX"
  ;&
4)
  echo "JUMPED"
  ;&
esac

only prints "BROWN"

How do I make the case statement in bash "fall through" to the remaining conditions like the first example?

(edit: Bash version 3.2.25, the ;& statement (from wiki) results in a syntax error)

running:

test.sh:

#!/bin/bash
A=2
case $A in
1)
  echo "QUICK"
  ;&
2)
  echo "BROWN"
  ;&
3)
  echo "FOX"
  ;&
esac

Gives:

./test.sh: line 6: syntax error near unexpected token ;' ./test.sh:
line 6:
;&'

share|improve this question
    
Added error for ;& –  Resorath Aug 17 '12 at 18:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The ;& and ;;& operators were introduced in bash 4.0, so if you want to stick with a five year old version of bash, you'll either have to repeat code, or use ifs.

if (( a == 1)); then echo quick; fi
if (( a > 0 && a <= 2)); then echo brown; fi 
if (( a > 0 && a <= 3)); then echo fox; fi
if (( a == 4)); then echo jumped; fi

or find some other way to achieve the actual goal.

(On a side note, don't use all uppercase variable names. You risk overwriting special shell variables or environment variables.)

share|improve this answer
    
Or use functions not to repeat a lot of code.. –  user405725 Aug 17 '12 at 18:16
    
Interesting note about the bash version. –  Resorath Aug 17 '12 at 18:17
    
Wow! Thank you, I see now my 'new' MacBookPro 2012 has a very old 2007 Bash: GNU bash, version 3.2.48(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin12) –  AnneTheAgile Dec 7 '13 at 18:07
1  
@AnneTheAgile, yes. bash 3.2 is GPLv2, bash 4.0 (and newer) is GPLv3, and Apple "doesn't like" GPLv3 (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPL_v3#Legal_Barrier_to_App_Stores). Though you can easily get a recent bash with homebrew or macports or similar, of course. –  geirha Dec 9 '13 at 10:02

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