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One of my 'for the hell of it' projects I started yesterday was a Befunge interpreter. I have it working for the most part except for an edge case.

I got lazy and decided to read in a befunge program with this:

char[][] program = File.ReadAllLines(args[0]).Select(x => x.ToCharArray()).ToArray();

I knew I was creating more work for myself later, but I wanted to get to other parts and left it at that. Now it's later and I need to fix the fact that program is not rectangular. Let's say I had this befunge program:

v   v   <
    @
>       ^

The 1st and 3rd lines are 9 characters long, but the 2nd line is only 5. In the way I have my befunge interpreter set up, I will get an IndexOutOfBoundsException before the program terminates because after interpreting ^ as a change of direction I would try to access program[1][8] and program[1] is only 5 long. Instead of trying to catch the exception and dance around it, how could I create a char[,] using program and filling the extra characters with spaces?

I know I could just determine the length of the longest line, the number of lines, create the char[,] with those and copy them over, but I'm hoping for something a little simpler and more elegant. I am completely ok with throwing out the above line if a new approach is better.

share|improve this question
1  
I think you answered your question up there: "just determine the length of the longest line, the number of lines, create the char[,] with those and copy them over" – Almo Aug 17 '12 at 17:59
    
Oh, and props for making a Befunge interpreter. That's a cool esolang. I made a shockwave game like that many years ago where you programmed robots like in Carnage Heart. – Almo Aug 17 '12 at 17:59
    
Having only one solution doesn't make it the best solution. I can learn more about C# if somebody can point me towards different way to do this. – Corey Ogburn Aug 17 '12 at 18:00
    
You could implement a sparse matrix structure and have it return a space if nothing is at a requested point. – QtotheC Aug 17 '12 at 18:03
    
Can you modify the files so that they are all of the same length (padding with spaces or whatever to get that to happen)? Could you include a header on the first line with the max width of a line? Note that you don't need to have a 2D array, it can be jagged, so long as all of the inner arrays are the same size. – Servy Aug 17 '12 at 18:04

Rather than re-creating the entire jagged array (assuming it could be rather large) you could just create a wrapper for it. That wrapper would be able to do the bounds checking and return some default value if it would be out of bounds rather than erroring.

public class Matrix<T>
{
  public T[][] UnderlyingCollection {get;set;} //should probably be readonly and set in the constructor

  public T DefaultValue {get;set;}

  public T this[int i, int j]
  {
    get
    {
      if(UnderlyingCollection.Length > i && UnderlyingCollection[i].Length > j)
        return UnderlyingCollection[i][j];
      else
        return DefaultValue;
    }
    set
    { /*TODO implement*/ }

  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Being that this is for an interpreter, speed is a huge requirement (maybe I should have mentioned it). Your implementation has to validate i and j every single time a request is made. +1 tho, it still works. – Corey Ogburn Aug 17 '12 at 18:39
    
@CoreyOgburn Well, it doesn't have to validate i and j if i isn't valid, due to short circuiting, but it will usually validate them yes. Really though, validating those two is a very fast check. You'll need to be doing trillions and trillions of fetches to really see a significant time difference from those checks. – Servy Aug 17 '12 at 18:41
    
In your solution, if both values are correct it takes a certain amount of time, if not, it takes less time. I would rather a situation where time is saved if the variables are correct and extra time is used if they're incorrect (most likely it'd terminate the program). By doing a little one time setup to create a rectangular array, the proper case isn't slowed down by checks at all, it's just done. I know it's very small times I'm talking about, sometimes completely immeasurable, but I feel it's a better habit to be in. – Corey Ogburn Aug 17 '12 at 19:46
    
@CoreyOgburn The problem there is that the one time conversion to a 2D array isn't small at all; in fact it's rather large. You need to allocate the new memory, read all of the data for every value of the old structure, and copy it to the new one. That's not small at all, unless the whole structure is very small (and if it is performance won't likely be a big concern at all). If you know that you will only very, very rarely run into out of bounds errors you could no do the if check and catch the OOB exception, but exceptions are expensive. – Servy Aug 17 '12 at 20:05
    
@CoreyOgburn Dude, could you provide any feedback on my answer? Thanks! – Andre Calil Aug 17 '12 at 22:46

Building on @AndreCalil's previous answer, this might be more performant, especially for large arrays of primitive types. Arrays of primitive types can be treated as a flat buffer of bytes, which can be useful in this sort of work (if you've got experience with assembler or C):

static void Main( string[] args )
{
    string[][] jagged = new string[][] { new string[] { "alpha" ,                                              } ,
                                            new string[] { "bravo" , "charlie" ,                                  } ,
                                            new string[] { "delta" , "echo"    , "foxtrot" ,                      } ,
                                            new string[] { "golf"  , "hotel"   , "india"   , "juliet" ,           } ,
                                            new string[] { "kilo"  , "lima"    , "mike"    , "nancy"  , "oscar" , } ,
                                        } ;
    string[,]  rectangular = RectArrayFromJagged<string>( jagged ) ;

    return;
}

public static T[,] RectArrayFromJagged<T>( T[][] a )
{
    int  rows  = a.Length;
    int  cols  = a.Max( x => x.Length );
    T[,] value = new T[ rows , cols ] ;

    value.Initialize() ;

    if ( typeof(T).IsPrimitive )
    {
        int elementSizeInOctets = Buffer.ByteLength(value) / value.Length ;
        for ( int i = 0 ; i < rows ; ++i )
        {
            int rowOffsetInOctets = i * cols    * elementSizeInOctets ;
            int rowLengthInOctets = a[i].Length * elementSizeInOctets ;
            Buffer.BlockCopy( a[i] , 0 , value , rowOffsetInOctets , rowLengthInOctets ) ;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        for ( int i = 0 ; i < rows ; ++i )
        {
            int rowLength = a[i].Length ;
            for ( int j = 0 ; j < rowLength ; ++j )
            {
                value[i,j] = a[i][j] ;
            }
        }
    }
    return value ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the insight. Would be nice a vote from you, at least for the idea =) – Andre Calil Aug 17 '12 at 22:46
    
Sorry! There you go. – Nicholas Carey Aug 17 '12 at 22:52
    
Nope. Thanks dude. I'm going to run a micro benchmarking with our solutions – Andre Calil Aug 17 '12 at 22:54

Man, I'm not sure if this is what you're looking for, but check this out:

public static class CharArrayExtension
{
    public static char[,] FormatMatrix(this char[][] matrix)
    {
        int TotalColumns = matrix.Length;
        int TotalLines = 0;

        //Get the longest line of the current matrix
        for (int column = 0; column < TotalColumns; column++)
        {
            int line = matrix[column].Length;

            if (line > TotalLines)
                TotalLines = line;
        }

        //Instantiate the resulting matrix
        char[,] Return = new char[TotalColumns, TotalLines];

        Return.Initialize();

        //Retrieve values from the current matrix
        for (int CurrentColumn = 0; CurrentColumn < TotalColumns; CurrentColumn++)
        {
            int MaxLines = matrix[CurrentColumn].Length;

            for (int CurrentLine = 0; CurrentLine < MaxLines; CurrentLine++)
            {
                Return[CurrentColumn, CurrentLine] = matrix[CurrentColumn][CurrentLine];
            }
        }

        return Return;
    }
}

Usage:

        char[] Length5 = new char[]{ 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'};
        char[] Length10 = new char[10];

        char[][] Matrix = new char[2][];
        Matrix[0] = Length5;
        Matrix[1] = Length10;

        char[,] FormattedMatrix = Matrix.FormatMatrix();

Any feedback will be appreciated.


UPDATE

Nicholas pointed out the performance issue. I was curious about it, so I made the following micro-weak-benchmarking:

        char[] Length5 = new char[]{ 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'};
        char[] Length10 = new char[10];

        char[][] Matrix = new char[2][];
        Matrix[0] = Length5;
        Matrix[1] = Length10;

        Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();

        stopWatch.Start();

        for (int i = 0; i < 5000; i++)
        {
            char[,] FormattedMatrix = Matrix.FormatMatrix();
        }

        stopWatch.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Andre Calil: {0} ms", stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

        stopWatch.Reset();

        stopWatch.Start();

        for (int i = 0; i < 5000; i++)
        {
            char[,] FormattedMatrix = RectArrayFromJagged<char>(Matrix);
        }

        stopWatch.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Nicholas Carey: {0} ms", stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds));

        Console.ReadLine();

I've run it multiple times, and the average results was:

Andre Calil: 3 ms
Nicholas Carey: 5 ms

I know that this is not a proper benchmarking, but looke like my solution isn't so bad in terms of performance after all.

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is exactly what I said I didn't want to do in the last part of my question. – Corey Ogburn Aug 18 '12 at 16:57
    
@CoreyOgburn You don't said you didn't want it you said that you'd prefer something more elegant and simple. Meanings are completely different and I think that your downvote is inappropriate. You came with a problem, I proposed a solution for it. – Andre Calil Aug 18 '12 at 19:07

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