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Currently we have a java application which have many different queries and not all are ran at one particular time. Thus for each query we plan to have a new statement and resultset and close them immediately? Below is given the snippet of code for how we run a query now.We have tried to cover each query with try and catch but the problem if the query fails them the rollback is not working on the global level. How best top put them in place to ensure no memory leak too?

try{ //main try outside

//lots of inner queries run based on some logics of if else etc


//sample query of opening and closing both statement and resultsets.

Statement stmt1 = null;
stmt1 = dbconn.createStatement();
String selectQuery1  = "Select querry";
ResultSet rs1 = stmt1 .executeQuery(selectQuery1);
while(rs1.next()) {
//process here

}
try{
  if (rs1 != null ){
     rs1.close();
  }
  if (stmt1!= null ){
    stmt1.close()
  }
}
catch(SQLException ex){
ex.printStackTrace(System.out);
}

dbconn.commit();
}
catch (SQLException ex) { 
 try {    
   dbconn.rollback();  
 } 
 catch (Exception rollback){    
  rollback.printStackTrace(System.out);
 }
}
catch (Exception e){
 try{    
    dbconn.rollback();  
 } 
 catch (Exception rollback) {    
   rollback.printStackTrace(System.out);
 }
}
share|improve this question
1  
"rollback is not working on the global level" - maybe auto-commit is set to "on" ? –  alfasin Aug 17 '12 at 18:14
    
Did you ever look at Spring JDBC Template? It reduces the mess with all these SQLExceptions. –  Sir RotN Aug 17 '12 at 18:15
    
The auto-commit is set to false in the very top before anything else begin. –  user837306 Aug 18 '12 at 7:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For rollback to work, you have to first check whether autoCommit is set to false initially. You would want to commit only when all your operations have been executed successfully.

One way of doing this might to use a structure like this:

Connection connection = getDBConnection(); //Depends on how you get your connection
boolean autoCommit = connection.getAutoCommit();
try{
    //Set autoCommit to false. You will manage commiting your transaction
    connection.setAutoCommit(false); 
    //Perform your sql operation

    if(doCommit){ //all your ops have successfully executed, you can use a flag for this
        connection.commit();
    }
}catch(Exception exe){
    //Rollback
}finally{
    connection.setAutoCommit(autoCommit); //Set autoCommit to its initial value
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess there is not other way beside the setting of a single variable and check its status towards the end? –  user837306 Aug 18 '12 at 7:11
Please try keeping dbconn.setAutoCommit(false) as first statement in your first try block so that it will not insert/update/delete query unless you say dbconn.commit()


try{
       conn.setAutoCommit(false);
      Statement stmt1 = null;
      stmt1 = dbconn.createStatement();
      String selectQuery1  = "Select querry";
      ResultSet rs1 = stmt1 .executeQuery(selectQuery1);
      while(rs1.next()) {
        //process here

      } 
      conn.commit();

      rs.close();
      stmt.close();
      conn.close();
   }catch(SQLException se){
      //Handle errors for JDBC
      se.printStackTrace();
      try{
         if(conn!=null)
            conn.rollback();
      }catch(SQLException se2){
         se2.printStackTrace();
      }//end try

   }catch(Exception e){
      e.printStackTrace();
   }finally{
      //finally block used to close resources
      try{
         if(rs!=null)
            rs.close();
      }catch(SQLException se2){
      }// nothing we can do
      try{
         if(stmt!=null)
            stmt.close();
      }catch(SQLException se2){
      }// nothing we can do
      try{
         if(conn!=null)
            conn.close();
      }catch(SQLException se){
         se.printStackTrace();
      }//end finally try
   }//end try
}//
share|improve this answer
    
yes dbconn.setAutoCommit(false);is set in the very top. But I would like to know is method we are using is it right method? –  user837306 Aug 18 '12 at 7:10
    
Please see code attached code to my reply –  Java P Aug 18 '12 at 8:18
    
the issue here is that this is ok for a single query we have multiple types of queries and at any one time not all are executed. So what do your suggest for that type of scenario? –  user837306 Aug 18 '12 at 10:32

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