Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been banging around with the process of migrating a site from Apache to Nginx and I'm about to lose my mind. The virtual host doesn't want to serve static resources (css, js, etc.) and I can't seem to figure out why. The server block looks like this:

server {
  listen      443 default_server ssl;
  server_name dev.myproject.mydomain.net;
  root        /opt/dev/myproject;
  index       index.php;

  ssl_certificate      /etc/ssl/certs/server.crt;
  ssl_certificate_key  /etc/ssl/certs/server.pem;

  access_log /var/log/nginx/vh.project.dev.access.log;
  error_log  /var/log/nginx/vh.project.dev.error.log;

  location ~ ^/alias_name/(.*) {
    alias /opt/dev/myproject/www/$1;

    location ~ ^/alias_name/(.+\.php)$ {
      alias /opt/dev/myprojectp/www/$1;
      include /etc/nginx/conf/php;
    }
  }

  location ~ \.php$ {
    include /etc/nginx/conf/php;
  }

  # deny access to .htaccess files, if Apache's document root
  # concurs with nginx's one
  #
  location ~ /\.ht {
    deny all;
  }
}

What am I missing? I know it's my inexperience with Nginx, but any advice would be much appreciated at this point.

Thanks.

UPDATE

This appears to be related to my alias which I was having trouble with before. If I point my document root to the alias location (/opt/dev/myprojectp/www), and try to render static content without the alias, it renders fine. As soon as I throw the alias in the URL...not so much.

share|improve this question
    
Could you show the content of your "/etc/nginx/conf/php"? –  VBart Aug 21 '12 at 13:21
add comment

2 Answers

Take from : http://kbeezie.com/view/nginx-configuration-examples/

# This block will catch static file requests, such as images, css, js
# The ?: prefix is a 'non-capturing' mark, meaning we do not require
# the pattern to be captured into $1 which should help improve performance
location ~* \.(?:ico|css|js|gif|jpe?g|png)$ {
    # Some basic cache-control for static files to be sent to the browser
    expires max;
    add_header Pragma public;
    add_header Cache-Control "public, must-revalidate, proxy-revalidate";
}
share|improve this answer
    
In this case, it's not a performance issue, it's simply that the static content isn't served at all. It simply throws a 403 error. –  Rob Wilkerson Aug 17 '12 at 19:09
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, so I may have found my own answer by brute force trial and error. This virtual host server block seems to serve PHP and static content properly:

server {
  listen      443 default_server ssl;
  server_name dev.myproject.mydomain.net;
  root        /opt/dev/project-root;
  index       index.php;

  ssl_certificate      /etc/ssl/certs/server.crt;
  ssl_certificate_key  /etc/ssl/certs/server.pem;

  access_log /var/log/nginx/myproject.dev.access.log;
  error_log  /var/log/nginx/myproject.dev.error.log;

  location ~ ^/alias_name/(.+\.php)$ {
    alias /opt/dev/project-root/www/$1;
    include /etc/nginx/conf/php;
  }
  location ~ ^/alias_name/(.*) {
    alias /opt/dev/project-root/www/$1;
  }

  location ~ \.php$ {
    include /etc/nginx/conf/php;
  }
}

I don't know whether I'll bump into problems and I can't say that I fully understand the difference, but simply removing the nested location blocks seems to have done the trick.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.