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Ok, well I have been at it for a while now and I decided to just use threads. I am making a syntax highlighter but I keep getting terrible performance with the file sizes that it will usually be used for. So I made two forms, the first shows the file in plain text and has a button that says "openincolor" when you click that I start a new thread as such

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ColoringThread colorer = new ColoringThread(this.m_bruteView.Text);
        Thread theThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(colorer.OpenColorWindow));
        theThread.Start();
    }

    public class ColoringThread
    {
        string text;
        public ColoringThread(string initText)
        {
            text = initText;
        }
        public void OpenColorWindow()
        {
            Form2 form2 = new Form2(text);
            form2.ShowDialog();
        }
    };

I want this form to send back a message each time it has complete say x lines of coloring. Then I will take that and figure out the progress and display it to the user.

How might I go about sending a message, or event(...? can I do that) to my first form to let it know of the others progress?

share|improve this question
    
You cannot simply run ShowDialog on another thread. Forget the idea that a Window 'runs on a thread'. – Henk Holterman Aug 17 '12 at 18:40
    
@HenkHolterman That is not strictly true. You can do it with some (large) restrictions. Here is an example of a splash screen being run on a separate thread. – AngryHacker Aug 17 '12 at 18:42
    
I said 'not simply'. And it's never a good idea, not even for a Splash. – Henk Holterman Aug 17 '12 at 18:44
    
I did simply do it though. I am not sure whats going on in the background though as you point out. Why is it not good as I did it? – AnotherUser Aug 17 '12 at 18:51
    
@HenkHolterman Why is it not a good idea. Splash screen is implemented like that in my WinForms app and it works perfectly fine. – AngryHacker Aug 17 '12 at 18:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

One very simple way to do this is with BackgroundWorker. It already provides an event to report progress.

share|improve this answer
    
I was looking here switchonthecode.com/tutorials/… at the second example. I like this idea, but my Form that I run has a member (the richtb) which does the work on itself. Form1-> Run Form2 in thread -> Tell rtb to Process -> when thats done display – AnotherUser Aug 17 '12 at 19:07
    
Are you running Form1 and Form2 on separate threads? I would not suggest that pattern. – Eric J. Aug 17 '12 at 19:34

How about something like this? This adds an event to the ColoringThread class which is subscribed to by the calling class.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    ColoringThread colorer = new ColoringThread(this.m_bruteView.Text);
    colorer.HighlightProgressChanged += UpdateProgress;
    Thread theThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(colorer.OpenColorWindow));
    theThread.Start();
}

private void UpdateProgress(int linesComplete) {
    // update progress bar here
}

public class ColoringThread
{
    string text;

    public delegate void HighlightEventHandler(int linesComplete);
    public event HighlightEventHandler HighlightProgressChanged;

    public ColoringThread(string initText) {
        text = initText;
    }

    public void OpenColorWindow() {
        Form2 form2 = new Form2(text);
        form2.ShowDialog();

        int linesColored = 0;
        foreach (String line in text.Split(Environment.NewLine)) {
            // colorize line here

            // raise event
            if (HighlightProgressChanged != null)
                HighlightProgressChanged(++linesColored);
        }
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is odd, my actual form does the coloring. When Form2 calls InitializeComponets (after it is called with showdialog in form1), I have the inputText processed before the form shows itself. How might I go about doing this how I have my classes setup? – AnotherUser Aug 17 '12 at 19:03
    
You should move the raise event part to wherever you do the actual syntax highlighting, and move the event declaration and delegate declaration to the Form2 – Paccc Aug 17 '12 at 19:28

You can pass an object as argument to the Thread.Start and share your data between the current thread and the initiating thread.


Here is a good example: How to share data between different threads In C# using AOP?


Or you can use BackgroundWorker which has ReportProgress

share|improve this answer

What you need is System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher's BeginInvoke method. You can't directly modify a WPF object from your background thread, however you can dispatch a delegate to do that.

In your derived Window class object you have the Property Dispatcher, so you use it as follows:

Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(
  DispatcherPriority.Normal,
  (status) => { StatusTextBox.Text = status },
  thestatus
);

I'm sorry that I can't test that currently and I don't have the project here, where I did that. But I'm sure it will work, good luck ;)

Update: Oops, you're using Form's... I've written about WPF, sorry.

share|improve this answer
1  
Your answer is valid if you replace Dispatcher.BeginInvoke with Control.BeginInvoke (specifically StatusTextBox.BeginInvoke in this case). That's the Windows Forms version of the Dispatcher code. If the code might be called from the UI thread, you can add a check to Control.InvokeRequired and then just execute your code (rather than "dispatch" it) if it returns false. For more info, see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0b1bf3y3 – Jon Senchyna Aug 17 '12 at 19:06

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