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Following is the code i have implemented to convert a BST to Sorted Doubly linked list. But for the following input i am missing the leftest rightmost sub-branch

For eg. for input 4 1 2 3 6 5 7 (input to BST)

I am missing nodes with data 2 and 3.Plz tell me what is wrong with the code?

#include<iostream>
 using namespace std;
struct node
{
int data;
node* left;
node* right;
};
node* tree=NULL;
int count=1;
void inorder(node *tree)
{
if(tree!=NULL)
{
     inorder(tree->left);
    cout<<tree->data<<" ";
    inorder(tree->right);
}
}
node * insert(node *tree,int n)
{
if(tree==NULL)
{
    tree=new node;
    tree->left=tree->right=NULL;
    tree->data=n;
}
else if(tree->data>n)
tree->left=insert(tree->left,n);
else
tree->right=insert(tree->right,n);
return(tree);

}
node *start=NULL;
node *prev=NULL;
node * head=NULL;
void func(node *root)
{
if(root!=NULL)
{
    func(root->left);
    if(start==NULL)
    {
        start=root;
        start->left=NULL;
        start->right=NULL;
        prev=start;
        head=start;
        //cout<<start->data<<"  ";
    }
    else
    {
        start->right=root;
        start=start->right;
        start->left=prev;
        prev=start;
       // cout<<start->left->data<<"  ";
    }
    func(root->right);
}
}
int main()
{
int n;

cout<<"Enter the number of nodes\n";
cin>>n;
int k=n;
int value;
while(n--)
{
   cin>>value; 
   tree=insert(tree,value);
}
inorder(tree);
cout<<endl;
func(tree);
cout<<endl;
while(head!=NULL)
{
    cout<<head->data<<"  ";
    head=head->right;
}
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this a homework? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Aug 17 '12 at 19:39
    
no its not a homework..i found this question on one of the website and then tried...and thanks to perreal for pointing out the mistake..problem is solved :) –  deepshikha Aug 17 '12 at 19:49
    
Then you shouldn't try to reinvent the wheel. Use the containers already available in STL. For example, it is very simple to copy from std::map to std::list. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Aug 17 '12 at 20:33
1  
There's is nothing wrong with re-inventing the wheel for learning purposes. –  Adrian McCarthy Aug 17 '12 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

The problem is in func For node with data = 1 ,you verride the right sub-tree to be NULL.And loose it

share|improve this answer

You are modifying the original tree in func. For example, for the first call to the func, start->right = NULL and func(root->right); together make little sense. Instead of doing start = root (and similar stuff) you can allocate memory using new and copy your nodes to the list.

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks perreal for pointing out the mistake :) –  deepshikha Aug 17 '12 at 19:50

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