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node-postgres states the following:

node-postgres supports both an 'event emitter' style API and a 'callback' style. The callback style is more concise and generally preferred, but the evented API can come in handy. They can be mixed and matched.

With the event emitter API, I can do the following:

var db = new pg.Client("insert-postgres-connection-info");
db.connect();

And then I can use db to execute queries throughout my web app using db.query('sql statement here'). With the callback style, I would do the following each time I want to run a query:

pg.connect(conString, function(err, client) {
  client.query("sql statement", function(err, result) {
    // do stuff
  });
});

So my question is why is it "generally preferred" to use the callback style? Isn't it inefficient to open a connection each time you do something with the database? What benefits are there from using the callback style?

EDIT

I might be mistaken as to what he means by "callback style" (I'm not kidding, my JavaScript isn't very strong) but my question is about the method of connection. I assumed the following was the callback style connection method:

// Simple, using built-in client pool

var pg = require('pg'); 
//or native libpq bindings
//var pg = require('pg').native

var conString = "tcp://postgres:1234@localhost/postgres";

//error handling omitted
pg.connect(conString, function(err, client) {
  client.query("SELECT NOW() as when", function(err, result) {
    console.log("Row count: %d",result.rows.length);  // 1
    console.log("Current year: %d", result.rows[0].when.getYear());
  });
});

and the following is the EventEmitter API connection method:

// Evented api
var pg = require('pg'); //native libpq bindings = `var pg = require('pg').native`
var conString = "tcp://postgres:1234@localhost/postgres";

var client = new pg.Client(conString);
client.connect();

If I'm just getting terms mixed up here, my question still remains. pg.connect(do queries) opens a new connection every time you use it (doesn't it?) whereas

var client = new pg.Client(conString);
client.connect();

opens a connection and then allows you to use client to run queries when necessary, no?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The EventEmitter style is more for this type of thing:

var query = client.query("SELECT * FROM beatles WHERE name = $1", ['John']);
query.on('row', function(row) {
  console.log(row);
  console.log("Beatle name: %s", row.name); //Beatle name: John
  console.log("Beatle birth year: %d", row.birthday.getYear()); //dates are returned as javascript dates
  console.log("Beatle height: %d' %d\"", Math.floor(row.height/12), row.height%12); //integers are returned as javascript ints
});

By mixing and matching, you should be able to do the following:

// Connect using EE style
var client = new pg.Client(conString);
client.connect();

// Query using callback style
client.query("SELECT NOW() as when", function(err, result) {
  console.log("Row count: %d",result.rows.length);  // 1
  console.log("Current year: %d", result.rows[0].when.getYear());
});

Note that even when using the callback style, you wouldn't open a connect every time you want to execute a query; most likely, you'd open a connection when the application starts and use it throughout.

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Edited my question in response to your answer. –  Brent Morrow Aug 17 '12 at 20:31
2  
Looking through the source, it looks like the module caches connections to the database; so even though you call pg.connect multiple times, you're actually getting the same connection (or, actually, one in a pool of connections). –  Brandon Tilley Aug 18 '12 at 1:26
    
That makes much more sense. Thanks for the help. –  Brent Morrow Aug 18 '12 at 3:56

There are pros and cons and the one you choose depends on your use case.

Use case 1: Return the result set to the client row-by-row.

If you're going to return data to the client much in the same way it comes out of the database - row by row - then you can use the event emitter style to reduce latency, which I define here as the time between issuing the request and receiving the first row. If you used the callback style instead, latency would be increased.

Use case 2: Return a hierarchical data structure (e.g. JSON) based on the entire result set.

If you're going to return data to the client in a hierarchical data structure such as JSON (which you would do to save bandwidth when the result set is a flat representation of a hierarchy), you should use the callback style because you are can't return anything until you have received all rows. You could use the event emitter style and accumulate rows (node-postgres provides such a mechanism so you don't have to maintain a map of partially built results by query), but it would be a pointless waste of effort because you can't return any results until you have received the last row.

Use case 3: Return an array of hierarchical data structures.

When returning an array of hierarchical data structures, you will have a lot of rows to get through all at once if you use the callback style. This would block for a significant amount of time which isn't good because you have only one thread to service many clients. So you should use the event emitter style with the row accumulator. Your result set should be ordered such that when you detect a change in value of a particular field, you know the current row represents the beginning of a new result to return and everything accumulated so far represents a now complete result which you can convert to your hierarchical form and return to the client.

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