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I have a pointer to a character array:

space=(char**)calloc(100000,sizeof(char*));
for(i=0;i<100000;i++){
    space[i]=(char*)calloc(1,sizeof(char));
}

such that when I use the following command

printf("%s\n",space[0]);

I get "a b c d e"

I want to assign "a b c d e" to

char c[10];

such that

printf("%s",c) yields

"a b c d e"

but when I try

c=space[0]

I get the following error:

incompatible types in assignment

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
You can't assign to an array. Use a char * instead, or use strcpy to copy the contents of space[0] into c. – Wug Aug 17 '12 at 19:46
    
Don't cast the return value of malloc in C – Ed S. Aug 17 '12 at 20:04
    
I don't see how you can get "a b c d e" from that printf with the above code. And I don't see what exactly you're trying to do. – netcoder Aug 17 '12 at 20:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, you need to allocate enough space to hold the entire string at location space[0]. Currently you are allocating a single character. After you do that you would use strcpy() to copy the string into the newly allocated buffer.

space=(char**)calloc(100000,sizeof(char*));
...
space[0]=(char*)calloc(10,sizeof(char));
strcpy(space[0], "a b c d e");

PS: Don't forget to free() any prior allocated strings at space[0] (like the one you create in the for() loop) before you allocate for the new string. Or you could use realloc() instead.

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c[0] is of the type char *. You either need to do c[0][0] or (char) c.

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