Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a JSON object like the following

{
   "data": [
      {
         "id": "18128270850211_49239570772655",
         "from": {
            "name": "Someone Unimportant",
            "id": "57583427"
         }
         /* more stuff */
      }
   ]
}

I want to parse it using JSON.NET,

FacebookResponse<FacebookPost> response = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<FacebookResponse<FacebookPost>>(json);

internal class FacebookResponse<T> where T : class
{
    public IList<T> Data { get; set; }
    public FacebookResponsePaging Paging { get; set; }
}

public class FacebookPost
{
    public string Id { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty("to.data.id")]
    public string FeedId { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty("from.id")]
    public string UserId { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty("created_time")]
    public DateTime CreatedTime { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty("updated_time")]
    public DateTime UpdatedTime { get; set; }

    public string Type { get; set; } // TODO: Type enum??

    public string Message { get; set; }
    public string Link { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Caption { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

Everything comes through except for the FeedId and the UserId properties. How should I be mapping these?

share|improve this question
    
You need to define a "from" class to match the json data. Same thing for "to" (if it differs from "from" in structure) and "data" – Egor Aug 17 '12 at 20:14
    
If you don't like having a lot of classes around you can use structs as well. I prefer them because they are just data like the JSON. – BlargleMonster Aug 17 '12 at 20:29
    
How about dynamic obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(json); var name = obj.data[0].from.name; ? – L.B Aug 18 '12 at 20:56
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use this site to get the object for .net

Then you can use JSON.Net to deserialize: ex.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(input) iirc

share|improve this answer
    
can't I do this directly? I was more interested in an attribute-based approach using JSON.NET features – bevacqua Aug 17 '12 at 20:39
public class From
{
    public string name { get; set; }
    public string id { get; set; }
}

public class Datum
{
    public string id { get; set; }
    public From from { get; set; }
}

public class FacebookPost
{
    public List<Datum> data { get; set; }
}

internal class FacebookResponse<T> where T : class
{
    public IList<T> Data { get; set; }
    public FacebookResponsePaging Paging { get; set; }
}

FacebookResponse<FacebookPost> response = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<FacebookResponse<FacebookPost>>(json);

Try below code :)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "Datum" :) – Egor Aug 17 '12 at 22:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.