Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code, and trying to avoid code duplication What I'd like to do is have a Custom Extension method say called "SelectGrouped"

that would accept a "Shift" object, and return the anonymous type (not sure if that possible)

var groupedFillingsCurrentShift = currentShift.FilingMeasurements
                    .Where(f => TimeSpan.Parse(f.MeasurementTime.MeasurementTime) == ShiftEnd)
                    .GroupBy(f => new { f.Medium, f.MeasurementTime })
                    .Select(t => new { t.Key.Medium, t.Key.MeasurementTime, VolumeInTanks = t.Sum(s => s.Filing) })
                    .ToList();


if (previousShift != null)
{
    var groupedFillingsPreviousShift = previousShift.FilingMeasurements
        .Where(f => TimeSpan.Parse(f.MeasurementTime.MeasurementTime) == previousShift.ShiftEnd)
        .GroupBy(f => new { f.Medium, f.MeasurementTime })
        .Select(t => new { t.Key.Medium, t.Key.MeasurementTime, VolumeInTanks = t.Sum(s => s.Filing) })
        .ToList();

What I'd like to achieve is to have it look like so

var groupedResultCurrentShift = 
   currentShift.SelectGrouped(t=>t.Medium, t.MeasurementTime, t.VolumenInTanks);

var groupedResultPreviousShift = 
   previousShift.SelectGrouped(t=>t.Medium, t.MeasurementTime, t.VolumenInTanks);
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, what you want can't be done in its current form.

First off, the variable t only has value in the lambda. The commas separate parameters, and so t loses its scope for the other parameters.

Second and more importantly, anonymous types are locally scoped by definition, because you have to use "var" to imply the type of a variable that holds them. You can't pass them in as parameters nor return them as return values (well, technically you can using dynamic, but let's not go there, please).

If you were to define a named type that could be used to hold the final form of the projected data, this would work:

internal class VolumeData
{
   public string Medium;
   public DateTime MeasurementTime;
   public decimal VolumeInTanks;
}

public static List<VolumeData> GetVolumeData(this Shift shift)
{
   return shift.FilingMeasurements
               .Where(f => TimeSpan.Parse(f.MeasurementTime.MeasurementTime) == ShiftEnd)
               .GroupBy(f => new { f.Medium, f.MeasurementTime })
               .Select(t => new VolumeData{ 
                                Medium = t.Key.Medium, 
                                MeasurementTime = t.Key.MeasurementTime, 
                                VolumeInTanks = t.Sum(s => s.Filing) })
               .ToList();
}

...

var groupedFillingsCurrentShift = currentShift.GetVolumeData();


if (previousShift != null)
    var groupedFillingsPreviousShift = previousShift.GetVolumeData();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanx. That was my suspicion too, that I'd need to use dynamic to implement this. (or hard type a class). –  Marty Aug 17 '12 at 20:35
add comment
var groupedResultCurrentShift = 
 currentShift.SelectGrouped(t=>t.Medium, t.MeasurementTime, t.VolumenInTanks);

Makes no sense, because the t of the second and third clause isn't defined, and VolumenInTanks relates to a property that you haven't created yet.

We also have a problem, in that the Select in your query relates to an anonymous object defined earlier in the same scope. This prevents us from defining a method that lets us pass in a lambda defining what should be selected.

However:

currentShift.FilingMeasurements
                .Where(f => TimeSpan.Parse(f.MeasurementTime.MeasurementTime) == ShiftEnd)
                .GroupBy(f => new { f.Medium, f.MeasurementTime })
                .Select(t => new { t.Key.Medium, t.Key.MeasurementTime, VolumeInTanks = t.Sum(s => s.Filing) })
                .ToList();

is equivalent to;

currentShift.FilingMeasurements
                .Where(f => TimeSpan.Parse(f.MeasurementTime.MeasurementTime) == ShiftEnd)
                .GroupBy(f => new { f.Medium, f.MeasurementTime }, s => s.Filing)
                .Select(t => new { t.Key.Medium, t.Key.MeasurementTime, VolumeInTanks = t.Sum() })
                .ToList();

Now, this still isn't quite there, but let's consider that we get the same information from:

currentShift.FilingMeasurements
                .Where(f => TimeSpan.Parse(f.MeasurementTime.MeasurementTime) == ShiftEnd)
                .GroupBy(f => new { f.Medium, f.MeasurementTime }, s => s.Filing)
                .Select(t => new { t.Key, VolumeInTanks = t.Sum() })
                .ToList();

So. If you'd be willing to have to do item.Key.Medium rather than item.Medium, then we're in business:

We need a return type, so we'll create one:

public class GroupedCount<T>
{
  public<T> Key{get;set;}
  public int Count{get;set;}//bit more of a general-purpose name than VolumeInTanks
}

Now, create our method:

public static List<GroupedCount<TKey>> ToGroupedCounts<TSource, TKey>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> pred, Func<TSource, TKey> keyGen, Func<TSource, int> tallyGen)
{
    currentShift.FilingMeasurements
                .Where(pred)
                .GroupBy(keyGen, tallyGen)
                .Select(t => new GroupedCount<TKey>{ Key = t.Key, Count = t.Sum() })
                .ToList();
}

We can now call:

currentShift.ToGroupedCounts(
  f => TimeSpan.Parse(f.MeasurementTime.MeasurementTime) == ShiftEnd,
  f => new { f.Medium, f.MeasurementTime },
  s => s.Filing
);

Since we want this to be general purpose, and ToList() shouldn't be called unless it's definitely needed in the specific case, it makes more sense to return an IQueryable:

public static IQueryable<GroupedCount<TKey>> ToGroupedCounts<TSource, TKey>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> pred, Func<TSource, TKey> keyGen, Func<TSource, int> tallyGen)
{
    currentShift.FilingMeasurements
                .Where(pred)
                .GroupBy(keyGen, tallyGen)
                .Select(t => new GroupedCount<TKey>{ Key = t.Key, Count = t.Sum() });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice :) Not really sure what You did there with the <T> Key. –  Marty Aug 17 '12 at 21:04
    
That's whatever your key type that goes along with the count is, so in the case of the call it's an anonymous object with Medium and MeasurementTime properties. It's created based on the second parameter (the first filters out those you don't want, and the third says what property you are summing). –  Jon Hanna Aug 17 '12 at 21:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.