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For some reason, the following program crashes before "i got here" is printed. When I comment out the try-catch part, the program runs and exits normally.

#include <iostream>

int error_function () {

    throw 5;

    return 0;
}


int main () {

    double* b = new double[6];

    for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
        b[i] = i;
    }

    double* c = new double(*b);

    for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
        c[i] = i+1;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
        std::cout << b[i] << " " << c[i] << std::endl;
    }

    try {
        error_function();
    }
    catch (int t) {
        std::cout << "catched an int: " << t << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "i got here" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

This is the entire output I get when the program crashes:

0 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
5 6
catched an int: 5
*** glibc detected *** ./main: free(): invalid next size (fast): 0x0000000001f22070 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/libc.so.6(+0x77806)[0x7f2b273a0806]
/lib/libc.so.6(cfree+0x73)[0x7f2b273a70d3]
./main[0x400d92]
(a bunch of stuff)
Aborted

I have no idea why this is happening. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
This may be a duplicate. Or at least the same error with an answer~ –  Don'tWasteYourTime Aug 17 '12 at 20:51
2  
I'm confused at why you're using arrays like that. Even without the better containers, why not just double b[6]; double c[6]; You can also combine the filling loops (and even printing) into just one, or use std::iota to fill them if you have C++11. –  chris Aug 17 '12 at 20:51
    
Hi chris, I wrote the program that way because i'm trying to understand what double c* = new double(b*) does exactly. –  user1607425 Aug 17 '12 at 20:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's crashing because you've only allocated one double when you allocate c and then proceed to overrun the bounds by accessing elements after the first. It looks as if in this case after the exception has been handled there is some cleanup and the glibc has detected corrupt memory.

The problem lines are these:

double* c = new double(*b);

for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
        c[i] = i+1;
}

It allocates a new double that copies the value of *b (or b[0] if you like) because b is just a pointer so dereferencing it does not invoke the copy constructor that copies an array.

You would be better off using a std::vector as it would automatically take care of any memory allocation and deallocation for you as well as being exception safe. In the case your error_function threw an exception that you did not handle it would still clean up correctly, whereas your new'd memory does not as it stands.

Technically it's undefined behaviour, so anything could happen.

share|improve this answer
1  
To be more accurate, even the principle of using new is fail. –  Puppy Aug 17 '12 at 20:52
    
@DeadMG: Indeed, I've highlight a couple of reasons not to use it. Thanks. –  tinman Aug 17 '12 at 20:57
    
Thanks tinman, that clarifies it. I just wrote this program to play with some features of the language. In practice I would never allocate arrays in this manner and indeed use std::vector instead. –  user1607425 Aug 17 '12 at 21:01

Your problem is here:

double* c = new double(*b);

This is allocating space for one double and giving it an initial value of b[0]. Later on you are assigning to c[1], etc. This is undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer

Adding to timans answer.

Your program is doing a heap overrun.

for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
    c[i] = i+1;
}

double c[0] has an address of new double and value of b[0].but c[1],c[2],.... they may overwrite any other system information related to the program and then behavior becomes uncertain.

Change this line and the program should work fine

double* c = new double[6];
for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
    c[i] = b[i]+1;
}

and don't forget to call delete[] before returning from main.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP meant to copy the value of the elements of b to the newly allocated elements of c, so you'd need to include something to copy those elements after allocating c to have it the same functionality. –  tinman Aug 17 '12 at 21:08
    
@tinman:- how about this??? :) –  perilbrain Aug 17 '12 at 21:13
    
Better but I just re-read the code after his allocation and now I'm not sure whether he meant to copy it since he overwrites it immediately. So either this version or your previous version are probably both suitable. –  tinman Aug 17 '12 at 21:19

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