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I have a page that recovers data from json and generates a list of products. The user can switch between two different styles when clicking in a button that changes the parent ul to ul.fullview. When browsing the products with ul.fullview on, the products that received the class .highlighted should appear with a bigger thumbnail, while the other products receive an absolute position to fit into the layout. This is all done by CSS and a simple tooggleClass(). The problem lies on the mouseenter / mouseleave event within these two different views. When browsing using the default view, all the products should have the same animation. When the parent ul is .fullview, the .highlighted products must have a different animation. Since I'm working with dynamically added elements, I had to use .on() instead of .hover(). How can I make these selectors work with .on()?

$('div.products ul:not(.fullview) li:not(.highlighted)').hover(
  function () {
    $(this).find($('div.tooltip')).show();
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeIn(150);
  }, 
  function () {
    $(this).find($('div.tooltip')).fadeOut(150);
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeOut(150);
  }
);

$('li.highlighted').hover(
  function () {
    $(this).find($('div.description')).show();
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeIn(150);
  }, 
  function () {
    $(this).find($('div.description')).fadeOut(150);
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeOut(150);
  }
);

The code above should work if the elements were not added by javascript. I was able to make the default view work with the script below:

$('div.products ul').on({
    mouseenter: function () {
    $(this).find($('div.tooltip')).show();
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeIn(150);
    },
    mouseleave: function () {
    $(this).find($('div.tooltip')).fadeOut(150);
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeOut(150);
    }
}, 'li');

But when I add these lines, it stops loading the json data:

$('div.products ul.fullview').on({
    mouseenter: function () {
    $(this).find($('div.description')).show();
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeIn(150);
    },

    mouseleave: function () {
    $(this).find($('div.description')).fadeOut(150);
    $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeOut(150);
    }
}, 'li.highlighted');

What am I doing wrong?

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+1 good question –  François Wahl Aug 17 '12 at 21:05
    
you have facebook-like in one line while all the rest refer to fb-like. –  guy mograbi Aug 17 '12 at 21:17
    
In the old code you have the selector div.products:not(.fullview) - indicating the fullview class was on div.products while in the new code your selector says div.products ul.fullview - which indicates the fullview class is no longer on the div, but it moved to the ul. –  guy mograbi Aug 17 '12 at 21:22
    
I've changed the code a bit because the classes were in another language. –  Sprite Aug 17 '12 at 21:26
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are saying:

changes the parent ul to ul.fullview

I would assume that makes ul.fullview dynamic as at the time of binding it is simply a ul without the 'fullview' class but then changed dynamically to have the class.

Try this:

$('div.products').on({
    mouseenter: function() {
        $(this).find($('div.description')).show();
        $(this).find($('div.facebook-like')).fadeIn(150);
    },

    mouseleave: function() {
        $(this).find($('div.description')).fadeOut(150);
        $(this).find($('div.fb-like')).fadeOut(150);
    }
}, 'ul.fullview li.highlighted');​
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, it's amazing that this question comes up in different forms ten times a day, when a search or just reading the DOCS would make it pretty clear what the issue is. –  adeneo Aug 17 '12 at 21:21
    
@adeno: +1, I think with full HTML elements it is always more obvious, but when classes are dynamically added and used within the selector to bind the event I do understand it is not always as obvious. However, you absolutely 100% right, reading the jQuery documentation is very, very useful. –  François Wahl Aug 17 '12 at 21:26
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I combined the two answers to a JSFiddle for your convenience. The brackets and selectors were adjusted according to others' answers.

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