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I have a java application:

a. server side - Swing application (i created a gui for the server with jTextArea, just to print the client requests)

b. client side - Swing application

in the server side i have the business layer which store data in some vectors.

now, in addition to the Swing application in the client side, i need to create a web application, which need to represent the same data from the vectors in the bl.

my question is, if i open a new web project, how can the servlet will get the data from the bl, because it's different project.. is it possible that my server side will listening to requests from the servlet? is it possible that they(the servlet and the server(a) ) will communicate via sockets?

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How do your initial client/server communicate? I've never heard of a "swing server application", so we may be stumbling on vocabulary here. Your server is just a program that services client applications. You can have a GUI for administering your server, such as managing users, etc, but that is external to the server code...usually. –  jeff Aug 17 '12 at 21:45
    
@jeff, the client server communicate via sockets. i did gui for the server, just to see the client request and print them on the jTEXTAREA (to check if it works.. ) –  eliorsh Aug 17 '12 at 21:49
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I think the best way is to create a new Web Project. In the Gui of the web page to have some buttons.. and when some button was clicked I'll redirect him to the servlet. Now the Servlet will communicate with the Server side via sockets, to get the data about the BL. when the servlet recieve this data, I'll create a new Web page and show the data.

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So you want to expose your business logic to another medium, in this case HTTP. You have quite a few options. By going with a servlet (which will require some sort of servlet container to run, such as Tomcat or Jetty, etc), you can take advantage of a lot of nice server features, such as Session management, Thread pooling, etc. If you tried to modify your existing server to also accept HTTP communication, you would miss out on these unless you implemented them yourself.

So my recommendation for your architecture would be:

Put your business logic behind a web service (which can be done using a servlet). So it will understand HTTP communication and it will get you those nice features. Then change your Swing client to talk to your new web service with HTTP requests.

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Yes, I want to expose my business logic to HTTP. one of the requirements is to have 2 UI: 1) swing UI , 2) web UI so i cant change the swing client. can i write the servlet in the server side? but in this case how the web will send the requests? –  eliorsh Aug 18 '12 at 4:32
    
sorry, but i can't edit my first comment.. so by writing the servlet in the server side, i mean to add a new class as SERVLET that will handle the HTTP request. but if i do that, i'll have some problem, because if i have some buttons in the web project when i click on them, how can i direct them to servlet? is it possible? –  eliorsh Aug 18 '12 at 7:14
    
your web project will have your servlet and some web pages (JSP, HTML, etc). In the project you map your servlet to a URL and your HTML forms will post to those URLs –  jeff Aug 18 '12 at 16:55
    
hi, what i did is: in my web project i have the servlet and to get the data about my bl. the servlet talks with the server side through sockets. now i have a question the jsp is more for html code, right? so if the servlet store the data in vectors, how can i send it to the jsp? –  eliorsh Aug 19 '12 at 11:28
    
ok, to send parameters from servlet to jsp, we need to use reqeuest.setParamter(). –  eliorsh Aug 20 '12 at 6:46
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