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I'm somewhat new to using XML in my files and wanted to serialize and then de-serialize an object. The object contained a pair of string, an int, and then two int[] arrays. serializing with XmlSerializer went fine with the generated XML looking like this:

http://codepaste.net/x9x5ms

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<Harvey xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Name>Carl</Name>
  <Ch>KNV</Ch>
  <Tn>40</Tn>
  <APoints>
    <int>8</int>
    <int>20</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>12</int>
    <int>12</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>4</int>
    <int>4</int>
    <int>4</int>
  </APoints>
  <SPoints>
    <int>3</int>
    <int>12</int>
    <int>10</int>
    <int>10</int>
    <int>6</int>
    <int>6</int>
    <int>10</int>
    <int>10</int>
  </SPoints>
</Harvey>

The problem is trying to load the int[] values back into their arrays. I haven't been able to figure out how to tell the application that I want to load all the Apoints into an int[] array. I suspect the solution is really simple, but I just haven't been able to figure it out.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As easy as

[XmlRoot( "Harvey" )]
public class Widget
{

    [XmlElement]
    public string Name { get ; set; }

    [XmlElement]
    public string Ch   { get ; set; }

    [XmlElement]
    public int    Tn   { get ; set; }

    [XmlArray("APoints")]
    [XmlArrayItem("int")]
    public int[] APoints { get ; set ; }

    [XmlArray("SPoints")]
    [XmlArrayItem("int")]
    public int[] SPoints { get ; set ; }

}

class Program
{
    public static T Rehydrate<T>( string xml )
    {
        T instance ;
        XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer( typeof(T) ) ;

        using ( TextReader tr = new StringReader( xml ) )
        {
            instance = (T) serializer.Deserialize( tr ) ;
        }
        return instance ;
    }


    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        string xml = @"
<Harvey xmlns:xsi=""http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"" xmlns:xsd=""http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"">
  <Name>Carl</Name>
  <Ch>KNV</Ch>
  <Tn>40</Tn>
  <APoints>
    <int>8</int>
    <int>20</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>12</int>
    <int>12</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>16</int>
    <int>4</int>
    <int>4</int>
    <int>4</int>
  </APoints>
  <SPoints>
    <int>3</int>
    <int>12</int>
    <int>10</int>
    <int>10</int>
    <int>6</int>
    <int>6</int>
    <int>10</int>
    <int>10</int>
  </SPoints>
</Harvey>
";
        Widget instance = Rehydrate<Widget>( xml ) ;

        return;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. You code led me here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Looks like there's another part of .Net XML my book didn't cover. Thanks for the advice. If anyone knows where I could find a good tutorial or book on the subject let me know. –  ChargerIIC Aug 18 '12 at 0:47
1  
@ChargerIIC: you might look at Niel Bornstein's .Net and XML (2003) - shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596003975, also Dino Esposito's Applied XML Programming for .Net (2002) - amazon.com/Applied-XML-Programming-Microsoft-NET/dp/0735618011. Both a little dated, but still quite useful as the basics haven't changed too much. –  Nicholas Carey Aug 20 '12 at 16:30

Something simpler than serialization:

XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(xml));
XElement root = XElement.Load(reader);

int[] myInts = ((IEnumerable)root.XPathEvaluate("APoints/int"))
                 .OfType<XElement>()
                 .Select(el => int.Parse(el.Value))
                 .ToArray();
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Here is the class I wrote some time ago:

public static class Serializer
{
    // returns false in case of an error
    public static bool save(string fileName, Object obj)
    {
        XmlSerializer serializer = null;
        TextWriter textWriter = null;
        bool res = false;

        try
        {
            serializer = new XmlSerializer(obj.GetType());
            textWriter = new StreamWriter(fileName);
            serializer.Serialize(textWriter,obj);
            res = true;
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            // handle error
        }
        finally
        {
            if (null != textWriter)
                textWriter.Close();
        }

        return res;
    }

    // returns null in case of an error
    public static Object load(Type type, string fileName)
    {
        XmlSerializer deserializer=null;
        TextReader textReader=null;
        Object res = null;
        try
        {
            deserializer = new XmlSerializer(type);
            textReader = new StreamReader(fileName);
            res=deserializer.Deserialize(textReader);

        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            // handle error
        }
        finally
        {
            if (null != textReader)
                textReader.Close();
        }

        return res;
    }
}

And this is how you use it:

public class Data
{
    public int a;
    public int[] arr;
}

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Data myData = new Data();
    myData.a = 2;
    myData.arr=new int[]{1,2,3,7};
    Serializer.save("file.xml", myData);
}

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Data myData;
    myData = (Data)Serializer.load(typeof(Data), "file.xml");

}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: This code has multiple problems. The XmlSerializer doesn't use [Serializable]. Also, you're not placing the XmlReader/Writer and StreamReader/Writer into using blocks. And ignoring exceptions is a horrible idea. –  John Saunders Aug 17 '12 at 23:58
    
@JohnSaunders *[Serializable] - sorry, my fault I quickly replaced the binary serialization I created earlier with xml serializaition. *Exception handling - sure it's usually a bad idea to ignore it, but it's his job to handle it somehow. Anyway, I changed the comment. –  gisek Aug 18 '12 at 0:10
    
No, it's almost always a bad idea to catch an exception and do nothing with it. If you're not going to handle it, then don't catch it. The caller will not be able to handle it if you've consumed the exception. –  John Saunders Aug 18 '12 at 0:12
    
@JohnSaunders will putting the reader/writer into using blocks do something more than automatically close the stream? –  gisek Aug 18 '12 at 0:19
    
First of all, I misread your code. You don't have a separate XmlReader/XmlWriter. Second, the only remaining problem is the empty catch blocks. I suggest that instead of the try/catch/finally, you just use using. That way, you won't be tempted to use the empty catch blocks, preventing your caller from knowing what went wrong and doing something about it. –  John Saunders Aug 18 '12 at 1:00

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