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In my spare time, I'm creating a small business framework that I can reuse for my school projects. I suppose it would be similar to a dumbed down CSLA, if that can give you an idea.

I'm having a bit of trouble with the business rule class though. Here's what it looks like right now :

public class Rule
{
    public string PropertyName { get; }
    public string Description { get; }
    public Func<object, bool> ValidationRule { get; }

    public Rule(string propertyName, string message, Func<object, bool> validationRule)
    {
        this.PropertyName = propertyName;
        this.Description = description;
        this.ValidationRule = validationRule;
    }

    public bool IsBroken(object value)
    {
        return ValidationRule(value);
    }
}

I'm not a huge fan of the boxing and unboxing I'm doing when I'm checking to see if the rule is broken (value can be any type).

Of course, I could just make the whole class generic and have my IsBroken function take an object of type T (probably a better idea than using objects anyway), but I was wondering if it would be possible to do something similar to the following :

public class Rule
{
    public Func<T, bool> ValidationRule { get; }
    public bool IsBroken<T>(T value)
    {
        return ValidationRule(value);
    }
}

Without declaring the class with a generic type?

Any other tips are welcome.

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1  
The only way to share introduced generic types across methods/properties is to move them to the (or "a") class declaration. In this case it seems appropriate. Then, also implement an interface, say IRule that will allow support for "untyped object access" (and allow shoving these rules into mixed Rule<any> collections or whatnot). Then either the specific Rule<T> can be used, or a less refined IRule can be used, where it it not possible to deal with Rule<T>. –  user166390 Aug 17 '12 at 23:52
    
If I am not mistaken, you can use typeof or something in the System.Type class to determine the type, and simply pass the object as a dynamic and cast it. –  huadianz Aug 17 '12 at 23:57
1  
If you know the T while calling IsBroken, you probably know it while instantiating a Rule object, why don't you just change it to Rule<T> ? –  Mennan Kara Aug 18 '12 at 0:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I was wondering if it would be possible to do something similar to the following :
[...]
Without declaring the class with a generic type?

No, it's not possible. How would the compiler and/or the runtime know what type is T for property declaration?

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1  
Check out my edit - methods are ok to be generic in non-generic class, but properties aren't. –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 17 '12 at 23:57
    
The dynamic keyword forces verification at runtime for all related functions, bypassing that restriction. –  huadianz Aug 17 '12 at 23:57
1  
@AlexeiLevenkov It doesn't matter here. Even if it were possible to introduce a new generic type for the property, it would be a different type .. imagine if there are two methods (which by the post can introduce new generic types) that both introduce T; it is a different T for each method. –  user166390 Aug 17 '12 at 23:58
1  
@AlexeiLevenkov Presumably there wasn't enough use-case/payoff to allow Func<T,T> Prop<T> { get;set; } (where T is a "property generic" in this hypothetical code) or similar definitions over properties .. here is a post "Why aren’t there generic properties in C#?" that asks similar questions. –  user166390 Aug 18 '12 at 0:01
    
@pst, I'm not sure I follow what you are suggesting about my edit... Your link/comment seem to say the same: one can't have generic properties in non-generic class unlike methods. –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 18 '12 at 0:16

declare Rule class as generic is the only way moreover it is interesting for you because you will want to set constraint on your T generic

 public class Rule<T>
    {
        public Func<T, bool> ValidationRule { get; }
        public bool IsBroken<T>(T value)
        {
            return ValidationRule(value);
        }
    }
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