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I have a rather repetitive switch case statement and in my quest to learn the simplest way of doing things, I wanted to turn to SO and see if there is a more elegant solution to the following:

        switch(id)
        {
            case 'ib-02a':
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('ib-02b');
                break;
            case 'ib-02b':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('ib-02a');
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('ib-02c');
                break;
            case 'ib-02c':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('ib-02b');
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('ib-02d');
                break;
            case 'ib-02d':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('ib-02c');
            break;

            case 'ib-03a':
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('ib-03b');
                break;
            case 'ib-03b':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('ib-03a');
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('ib-03c');
                break;
            case 'ib-03c':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('ib-03b');
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('ib-03d');
                break;
            case 'ib-03d':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('ib-03c');
            break;

            case 'pb-05a':
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('pb-05b');
                break;
            case 'pb-05b':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('pb-05a');
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('pb-05c');
                break;
            case 'pb-05c':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('pb-05b');
                if(direction == 'left')
                    setHash('pb-05d');
                break;
            case 'pb-05d':
                if(direction == 'right')
                    setHash('pb-05c');
            break;
        }

I'm reading swipe events, and if the ID of the element I am swiping on matches either ib-02*, ib-03*, or pb-05*, I am calling a setHash function for the appropriate ID. If I'm swiping on *a, I swipe left to *b. If I'm swiping on *b, I swipe right to *a and left to *c. So on and so forth, always between *a and *d.

There must be a less repetitive way to do this, but I'm not sure exactly what the best approach is.

Any help is appreciated.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about mapping them to an object? Then just use the setHash with the retrieved value.

var ids = {
    'pb-05c' : {
        left : 'pb-05d',
        right : 'pb-05b'
    }
    ...
}

function setHashes(id,direction){
    if(id && ids[id]){
        id = ids[id];
        if(direction && id[direction]){
            setHash(id[direction]);
        }
    }
}

It's all retrieval and no condition evaluation, which can be good for performance.

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3  
This code would have issues (that the original code did not) if the id or direction did not exist in your data structure. –  jfriend00 Aug 18 '12 at 0:42
    
@jfriend00 true, I was just thinking about that. –  Joseph the Dreamer Aug 18 '12 at 0:43
    
I love this, but am wondering how to get around the issue of if there is no id or direction passed? –  Greg-J Aug 18 '12 at 0:56
1  
@Greg-J updated my answer. You just check if id and direction are there. –  Joseph the Dreamer Aug 18 '12 at 1:00

There are 4 major cases that are a, b, c and d, you can base your switch statement on these strings, try this:

var c = id.slice(0, 5); // "ib-02" or "ib-03" or "ib-04" ...
var which = id.slice(-1); // "a" or "b" or "c" or "d"
switch(which) {
    case 'a':
       if(direction == 'left')
             setHash(c+'b');
          break;
    case 'b':
       if(direction == 'right')
             setHash(c+'a');
       if(direction == 'left')
             setHash(c+'c');
          break;
    case 'c':
       if(direction == 'right')
             setHash(c+'b');
       if(direction == 'left')
             setHash(c+'d');
          break;
    case 'd':
       if(direction == 'right')
            setHash(c+'c');
          break;
}
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You can make the whole thing data table driven like this:

var logicData = {
    // format is the id first and then an array with the left, then right value for the hash
    // leave an item as an empty string if you don't ever want to go that direction
    'ib-02a': ['ib-02b', ''],
    'ib-02b': ['ib-02c', 'ib-02a'],
    'ib-02c': ['ib-02d', 'ib-02d']
    // fill in the rest of the data table here
};

function setNewHash(id, direction) {
    var hash, data = logicData[id];
    if (data) {
        if (direction == 'left') {
            hash = data[0];
        } else if (direction == 'right') {
            hash = data[1];
        }
        if (hash) {
            setHash(hash);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
id='ib-02a'; //you have string id, this one is for demo
id=[id.slice(0,--id.length), id.charAt(--id.length)];

switch(id[1]){
    case 'a':
        if(direction == 'left'){setHash(id[0]+'b');}
        break;
    case 'b':
        if(direction =='right'){setHash(id[0]+'a');}
        if(direction == 'left'){setHash(id[0]+'c');}
        break;
    case 'c':
        if(direction == 'right'){setHash(id[0]+'b');}
        if(direction == 'left'){setHash(id[0]+'d');}
        break;
    case 'd':
        if(direction == 'right'){setHash(id[0]+'c');}
        break;
}

If case b and c are only 'left' or 'right' you could use an else in those if statements.

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forgot to mention: this creates no new variables in it's parent scope and id can simply be rebuilt afterwards if needed by: id=id.join(''); –  GitaarLAB Aug 18 '12 at 2:48

I like the general direction of undefined and GitaarLab where they actually solved the algorithm and just implemented the algorithm. To review, the algorithm is basically that left increments the final letter and right decrements the final letter of the id, but you don't go below a or above d. So, I did a compact implementation of that where I convert the last letter to a number and increment or decrement it directly rather than using if/else or case statements:

function setNewHash(id, direction) {
    var base = id.substr(0, 5);
    var tag = id.charCodeAt(5), newTag;
    var nav = {left: 1, right: -1};
    var delta = nav[direction];
    if (delta) {
        tag += delta;
        newTag = String.fromCharCode(tag);
        if (newTag >= 'a' && newTag <= 'd') {
            setHash(base + newTag);
        }
    }
}

Working test case: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/gwfLD/

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Thank you for the compliment!! I also like your reusable function. I was also looking at the direction part, but did not know it's exact constraints. +1 –  GitaarLAB Aug 18 '12 at 2:50

You could chunk up the id into different parts, then rebuild them right before you do setHash.

function chunkId(id) {
    // use a regex or string split or something to convert
    // "ib-05a" to ["ib-05", "a"]
    return ["ib-05", "a"];
}

function next(str) {
    // return the next letter in the alphabet here
    return "b";
}

function prev(str) {
    // return the prev letter in the alphabet here
    return "b";
}

function swipe (id, direction) {
    var array = chunkId(id);
    // you can only swipe left if not on "d"
    if (direction === "left" && id[1] != "d") {
        setHash(id[0] + next(id[1])); // build hash based on next character
    }
    // you can only swipe right if not on "a"
    if (direction === "right" && id[1] != "a") {
        setHash(id[0] + prev(id[1])); // build hash based on prev character
    }
}
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You can switch the id and direction checks to make it clearer:

switch (direction) {
  case 'left':
    switch (id) {
      case 'ib-02a': setHash('ib-02b'); break;
      case 'ib-02b': setHash('ib-02c'); break;
      case 'ib-02c': setHash('ib-02d'); break;
      case 'ib-03a': setHash('ib-03b'); break;
      case 'ib-03b': setHash('ib-03c'); break;
      case 'ib-03c': setHash('ib-03d'); break;
      case 'pb-05a': setHash('pb-05b'); break;
      case 'pb-05b': setHash('pb-05c'); break;
      case 'pb-05c': setHash('pb-05d'); break;
    }
    break;
  case 'right':
    switch (id) {
      case 'ib-02b': setHash('ib-02a'); break;
      case 'ib-02c': setHash('ib-02b'); break;
      case 'ib-02d': setHash('ib-02c'); break;
      case 'ib-03b': setHash('ib-03a'); break;
      case 'ib-03c': setHash('ib-03b'); break;
      case 'ib-03d': setHash('ib-03c'); break;
      case 'pb-05b': setHash('pb-05a'); break;
      case 'pb-05c': setHash('pb-05b'); break;
      case 'pb-05d': setHash('pb-05c'); break;
    }
    break;
}

Then you can simplify if by splitting the id:

var first = id.substr(0, 5);
var last = id.substr(6);
switch (direction) {
  case 'left':
    switch (last) {
      case 'a': setHash(first + 'b'); break;
      case 'b': setHash(first + 'c'); break;
      case 'c': setHash(first + 'd'); break;
    }
    break;
  case 'right':
    switch (last) {
      case 'b': setHash(first + 'a'); break;
      case 'c': setHash(first + 'b'); break;
      case 'd': setHash(first + 'c'); break;
    }
    break;
}
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