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I am trying to read .wav file in C++, I thought I had done it until I checked out the data in matlab and wondered if someone knows where I going wrong.

Basically, I am reading the same file in on MatLab and C++ and I get the wrong the wrong results. Ok so here is the code:

bool Wav::readHeader(ifstream &file)
{>chunkId,                                 4);<char*>(&this->chunkSize),     4);>format,                                  4);>formatId,                                4);<char*>(&this->formatSize),    4);<char*>(&this->format2),       2);<char*>(&this->numChannels),   2);<char*>(&this->sampleRate),    4);<char*>(&this->byteRate),      4);<char*>(&this->align),         2);<char*>(&this->bitsPerSample), 4);

    char testing[4] = {0};
    int testingSize = 0;

    while(, 4) && (testing[0] != 'd' ||
                                    testing[1] != 'a' ||
                                    testing[2] != 't' ||
                                    testing[3] != 'a'))
    {<char*>(&testingSize), 4);
    file.seekg(testingSize, std::ios_base::cur);


   this->dataId[0] = testing[0];
   this->dataId[1] = testing[1];
   this->dataId[2] = testing[2];
   this->dataId[3] = testing[3];<char*>(&this->dataSize),     4);

   this->data = new char[this->dataSize];,                     this->dataSize);

   unsigned int *te;

   te = reinterpret_cast<int*>(&this->data);

   cout << te[3];

   return true;

And the result I get from the C++ file: 1031127695 And the result from MatLab: -0.0078

I don't understand what the problem is, any help would be amazing!

Thank you :)

share|improve this question
you are printing te, which is of type int. So clearly that is not going to print -0.0078. – TJD Aug 18 '12 at 1:09
Thanks @TJD Do you know which variable type do I use? – Phorce Aug 18 '12 at 1:50
The wav file header describes the format of the data samples. Most commonly that would be data samples that are 16-bit signed ints. Here's a detailed breakdown of the format There are many libraries available that will take care of wav file parsing for you – TJD Aug 18 '12 at 14:29
I'm not allowed to use a library.. So, I need to normalise each data and then format it correctly? Or, just recast the variables to 16-bit signed ints? – Phorce Aug 18 '12 at 14:53

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