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In Herb Sutter's book Exceptional C++ (1999), he has words in item 10's solution:

"Exception-unsafe" and "poor design" go hand in hand. If a piece of code isn't exception-safe, that's generally okay and can simply be fixed. But if a piece of code cannot be made exception-safe because of its underlying design, that almost always is a signal of its poor design.

Example 1: A function with two different responsibilities is difficult to make exception-safe.

Example 2: A copy assignment operator that is written in such a way that it must check for self-assignment is probably not strongly exception-safe either

What does he mean by the term "check for self-assignment"?

[INQUIRY]

Dave and AndreyT shows us exactly what "check for self-assignment" means. That's good. But the question is not over. Why does "check for self-assignment" hurts "exception safety"(according to Hurb Sutter)? If the caller tries to do self-assignment, that "check" works as if no assignment ever occurs. Does it really hurt?

[MEMO 1] In item 38 Object Identity later in Herb's book, he explains about self-assignment.

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"in such a way that it must" the most important word here is: must –  curiousguy Aug 18 '12 at 3:35
    
... still weird –  Jimm Chen Aug 20 '12 at 0:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The more important question in this case is what "written in such a way that it must check for self-assignment" means.

It means that a well designed assignment operator should not need to check for self-assignment. Assigning an object to itself should work correctly (i.e. have the end-effect of "doing nothing") without performing as explicit check for self-assignment.

For example, if I wanted to implemented a simplistic array class along the lines of

class array {
  ...
  int *data;
  size_t n;
};

and came up with the following implementation of the assignment operator

array &array::operator =(const array &rhs) 
{
  delete[] data;

  n = rhs.n;
  data = new int[n];
  std::copy_n(rhs.data, n, data);

  return *this;
}

that implementation would be considered "bad" since it obviously fails in case of self-assignment.

In order to "fix" it one can either add an explicit self-assignment check

array &array::operator =(const array &rhs) 
{
  if (&rhs != this) 
  {
    delete[] data;

    n = rhs.n;
    data = new int[n];
    std::copy_n(rhs.data, n, data);
  }

  return *this;
}

or follow a "check-less" approach

array &array::operator =(const array &rhs) 
{
  size_t new_n = rhs.n;
  int *new_data = new int[new_n];
  std::copy_n(rhs.data, new_n, new_data);

  delete[] data;

  n = new_n;
  data = new_data;

  return *this;
}

The latter approach is better in a sense that it works correctly in self-assignment situations without making an explicit check for it. (This implementation is still far for perfect from the exeption safety point of view, it is here to illustrate the difference between "checked" and "check-less" approaches to handling self-assignment). The later check-less implementation can be written more elegantly through the well-known copy-and-swap idiom.

This does not mean that you should avoid explicit checks for self-assignment. Such check do make sense from the performance point of view: there's no point in carrying out a long sequence of operations just to end up "doing nothing" in the end. But in a well-designed assignment operator such checks should not be necessary from the correctness point of view.

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1  
"Such check do make sense from the performance point of view" Rally, self assignment often happens in your programs? –  curiousguy Aug 18 '12 at 3:40
    
@curiousguy: Depends on the program, on the algorithm. If it allows self-assignment, so be it. Branchless code always look more elegant than branched one, meaning that I'd allow self-assigment to happen in such cases instead of trying to catch and prevent it on the outside. –  AnT Aug 18 '12 at 4:32
    
OK. I should admit, understanding that "check for self-assignment" statement needs a strong context. –  Jimm Chen Apr 22 '13 at 1:20

The general reason to check for self-assignment is because you destroy your own data before copying in the new one. This assignment operator structure is also not strongly exception safe.

As an addendum, it was determined that self-assignment does not benefit performance at all, because the comparison must run every time but self-assignment is extremely rare, and if it does occur, this is a logical error in your program (really). This means that over the course of the program, it's just a waste of cycles.

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"this is a logical error in your program (really)." really, it isn't. –  curiousguy Aug 18 '12 at 3:36
    
Self-assignment is a meaningless statement. Meaningless statements are never intentionally written by programmers; and therefore always errors. –  Puppy Aug 18 '12 at 3:53
1  
No, self assignment should have no effect. It is not meaningless. –  curiousguy Aug 18 '12 at 4:21
    
Having no effect is by definition meaningless, as the program is identical before and after it's execution. –  Puppy Aug 18 '12 at 4:35
3  
Self-assignments aren't always obvious. It's totally reasonable to assume that many STL algorithms (partitioning, sorting and such) will do self-assignments on the elements. –  fredoverflow Aug 18 '12 at 7:59
MyClass& MyClass::operator=(const MyClass& other)  // copy assignment operator
{
    if(this != &other) // <-- self assignment check
    {
        // copy some stuff
    }

    return *this;
}

Assigning an object to itself is a mistake but it shouldn't logically result in your class instance changing. If you manage to design a class where assigning to itself changes it, it's poorly designed.

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2  
@Mooing Duck Don't edit my answer so drastically. I don't even agree with what you added - it's the easy way out and almost always sub-optimal. Sometimes that's okay, sometimes it's not. Write your own answer. –  Dave Aug 18 '12 at 1:59
    
I figured the answer would be better if it also contained a sample of a good way to do things alongside the bad. Sorry if I stepped over the line. You're right that it's sub-optimal, but it's pretty standard, because it's fast enough, and hard to screw up. If you'd provide some bits on the right way to do assignment, I'd upvote. (doesn't have to be copy and swap, you're allowed to disagree with me) –  Mooing Duck Aug 18 '12 at 2:13
    
@MooingDuck I think almost all the time the right way is not to explicitly provide a copy assignment op. If you design your class well the default is all you'll ever want. –  Dave Aug 18 '12 at 2:25
    
That should be in the answer then. –  Mooing Duck Aug 18 '12 at 2:55

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