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I am trying to print a Russian "ф" character, which, is given a code of decimal 1060. Using C++, how can I print out this character? I would have thought something along the lines of the following would work, yet...

int main (){
   wchar_t f = '1060';
   cout << f << endl;
}
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1  
Note that the problem is two-fold (at least when it comes to a valid C++ program): expressing the character in code, and correctly passing it to std::cout. (And even when those two steps are done correctly it's a different matter altogether of correctly displaying the character inside whatever std::cout is connected to.) –  Luc Danton Aug 18 '12 at 4:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

To represent the character you can use Universal Character Names (UCNs). The character 'ф' has the Unicode value U+0444 and so in C++ you could write it '\u0444' or '\U00000444'. Also if the source code encoding supports this character then you can just write it literally in your source code.

// both of these assume that the character can be represented with
// a single char in the execution encoding
char b = '\u0444';
char a = 'ф'; // this line additionally assumes that the source character encoding supports this character

Printing such characters out depends on what you're printing to. If you're printing a Unix console, the console is using an encoding that supports this character, and that encoding matches the compiler's execution encoding, then you can do the following:

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::cout << "Hello, ф or \u0444!\n";
}

This program does not require that 'ф' can be represented in a single char. On OS X and most any modern Linux install this will work just fine, because the source, execution, and console encodings will all be UTF-8 (which supports all Unicode characters).

Things are harder with Windows and there are different possibilities with different tradeoffs.

Probably the best, if you don't need portable code (you'll be using wchar_t, which should really be avoided on every other platform), is to set the mode of the output file handle to take only UTF-16 data.

#include <iostream>
#include <io.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main() {
    _setmode(_fileno(stdout), _O_U16TEXT);
    std::wcout << L"Hello, \u0444!\n";
}

Portable code is more difficult.

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Ultimately, this is completely platform-dependent. Unicode-support is, unfortunately, very poor in Standard C++. For GCC, you will have to make it a narrow string, as they use UTF-8, and Windows wants a wide string, and you must output to wcout.

// GCC
std::cout << "ф";
// Windoze
wcout << L"ф";
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1  
IIRC, Unicode escapes are \uXXXX where the XXXX is for hex digits. Unfortunately, this leaves all the characters past U+FFFF out. –  Mike DeSimone Aug 18 '12 at 3:39
1  
@Mike: If you want past FFFF, you can do so by generating a UTF-16 surrogate pair yourself using two instances of \u, at least on windows. –  Billy ONeal Aug 18 '12 at 3:41
1  
The OP wants to specify the character in decimal, not hex, so string escapes are kind of useless. –  Mark Ransom Aug 18 '12 at 3:42
6  
@BillyONeal You do not use surrogate code points in C++ (in fact surrogate code points are completely prohibited). You use the format \UXXXXXXXX. –  bames53 Aug 18 '12 at 3:46
1  
GCC is not bound to use UTF-8, and is available for Windows. std::wcout is also an option outside of Windows. –  Luc Danton Aug 18 '12 at 4:48

When compiling with -std=c++11, one can simply

  const char *s  = u8"\u0444";
  cout << s << endl;
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1  
Let me recommend Boost.Nowide for printing UTF-8 strings to terminal in a portable way, so the above code will be almost unchanged. –  ybungalobill Aug 30 '12 at 10:47

'1060' is four characters, and won't compile under the standard. You should just treat the character as a number, if your wide characters match 1:1 with Unicode (check your locale settings).

int main (){
    wchar_t f = 1060;
    wcout << f << endl;
}
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1  
wcout instead of cout. –  Mark Ransom Aug 18 '12 at 3:35
    
I thought that was one of the points of iostreams: it would detect the type via overloaded operator << and Do The Right Thing. Not so much, I guess? –  Mike DeSimone Aug 18 '12 at 3:38
3  
'1060' is a multi-char character literal of type int, and is entirely legal under standard C++. It's value is implementation defined though. Most implementations will take the values of the characters and concatenate them to produce a single integral value. These are sometimes used for so-called 'FourCC's. –  bames53 Aug 18 '12 at 3:49
3  
Perhaps you'd be surprised how many warnings there are for entirely legal code. The C++ standard says "An ordinary character literal that contains more than one c-char is a multicharacter literal. A multicharacter literal has type int and implementation-defined value." [lex.ccon] 2.14.3/1 –  bames53 Aug 18 '12 at 4:01
1  
@MikeDeSimone "every non-Mac compiler I've used emitted at least a warning" because it is 1) almost never used on purpose on non-Mac systems 2) not a portable construct –  curiousguy Aug 18 '12 at 4:53

If you use Windows (note, we are using printf(), not cout):

//Save As UTF8 without signature
#include <stdio.h>
#include<windows.h>
int main (){
    SetConsoleOutputCP(65001); 
    printf("ф\n");
}

Not Unicode but working - 1251 instead of UTF8:

//Save As Windows 1251
#include <iostream>
#include<windows.h>
using namespace std;
int main (){
    SetConsoleOutputCP(1251); 
    cout << "ф" << endl;
}
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