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I am trying to create a string of six alphanumeric characters. The code below works fine most of the time but on the rare occasion a string of six alpha characters gets through, how can I ensure that the returned string is always alphanumeric?

String code = "";

while(!code.matches("[a-zA-Z0-9]+$"))
{
    code = Integer.toString((int) (Math.random() * Integer.MAX_VALUE), 36);
}

return code;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Repeated attempts is possibly the simplest, but you have to check it contains a letter and a digit.

String code;
do {
    code = Integer.toString((int) (Math.random() * Integer.MAX_VALUE), 36);
    if (code.length() > 6)
       code = code.substring(0, 6);
} while(!code.matches(".*\\w.*") || !code.matches(".*\\d.*") || code.length() < 6);
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1  
Are you sure it is .+? I think it should be .* –  Boris Strandjev Aug 18 '12 at 8:14
    
@BorisStrandjev You are right, it didnt take into account the length either. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 18 '12 at 8:21
    
All the strings have been alphanumeric so far, thanks a lot! What is the difference with the 'code'.+'code' and the 'code'.*'code'? –  cheeseman Aug 18 '12 at 9:44
    
The difference between .* and .+ is that the first requires a letter and a digit which is not the first or last character, the second allows it to any character. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 20 '12 at 19:01
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I believe that this regex should ensure that the string is always alphanumeric (contains at least one letter and one number)

(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[a-zA-Z]).+$
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Using that regex expression I still get some strings that are just alpha characters. One such string was "irtyfi". –  cheeseman Aug 18 '12 at 9:39
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