Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write a function which fills an array with a given value using scala macros. For instance a call to:

val ary = Array( 0, 1, 2 )
fill3( ary, 50+25 )

should be expanded to:

val ary = Array(0, 1, 2 )
{
  val $value = 50+25
  ary(0) = $value
  ary(1) = $value
  ary(2) = $value       
}

Here is my first attempt:

def fill3( ary: Array[Int], x: Int ) = macro fill_impl3

def fill_impl3( c: Context )
( ary: c.Expr[Array[Int]], x: c.Expr[Int]): c.Expr[Unit] = {
  import c.universe._        
  def const(x:Int) = Literal(Constant(x))

  //Precompute x
  val valName = newTermName("$value")
  val valdef = ValDef( Modifiers(), valName, TypeTree(typeOf[Int]), x.tree )

  val updates = List.tabulate( 3 ){
  i => Apply( Select( ary.tree, "update"), List( const(i), ??? ) )
  }

  val insts = valdef :: updates
  c.Expr[Unit](Block(insts:_*))
}

But here I'm stuck for two reasons:

  1. I don't know hot to get the precomputed value ($value)
  2. I need several of these function for Arrays of size 3, 4, 6, 9 and 27. Is there a way to dry the definitions, or should I write fill3, fill4, fill6, etc.

Is there the right way to proceed ? How can I solve my two problems ?

EDIT: I realized my initial question was stupid because the size must be known at compile time...

share|improve this question
    
Is the size of the array known at compile time? –  Kim Stebel Aug 18 '12 at 12:28
    
I just updated the question to clarify this point. I simplified the problem with a fixed size. –  paradigmatic Aug 18 '12 at 12:29
1  
What would be the benefit of using a macro here? –  Kim Stebel Aug 18 '12 at 12:32
    
And is the value known at compile time or can it be some arbitrary expression? –  Kim Stebel Aug 18 '12 at 12:37
    
@kimstebel 1. Learning macros. 2. I am rewriting a numerical intensive code that uses lots of computations on small size arrays (size known at compile time). I would like to see if I can gain some speed-up by unrolling all loops to avoid incrementing counters and the bound check. I plan to write vector operations this way. –  paradigmatic Aug 18 '12 at 12:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
def fill(size:Int, ary: Array[Int], x: Int ) = macro fill_impl

def fill_impl( c: Context )
(size:c.Expr[Int], ary: c.Expr[Array[Int]], x: c.Expr[Int]): c.Expr[Unit] = {
  import c.universe._        
  def const(x:Int) = Literal(Constant(x))

  val Literal(Constant(arySize:Int)) = size.tree

  //Precompute x
  val valName = newTermName("$value")
  val valdef = ValDef( Modifiers(), valName, TypeTree(typeOf[Int]), x.tree )

  val updates = List.tabulate( arySize ){
  i => Apply( Select( ary.tree, "update"), List( const(i), Ident(valName) ) )
  }

  val insts = valdef :: updates
  c.Expr[Unit](Block(insts:_*))
}
share|improve this answer
    
hmm this should work, but calling it makes the compiler crash... –  Kim Stebel Aug 18 '12 at 13:18
    
It works fine for me with '2.10.0-M6'. Thanks. –  paradigmatic Aug 18 '12 at 15:04
    
that is strange, I am using M6 too. Is your project available somewhere? –  Kim Stebel Aug 18 '12 at 15:19
    
The project is now on github: github.com/paradigmatic/hotloop –  paradigmatic Aug 19 '12 at 13:56
    
how do you compile that without splitting it into subprojects? –  Kim Stebel Aug 19 '12 at 15:28

You can try to figure it out by using reify along with printing the raw tree of its result:

def fill_impl3( c: Context )
( ary: c.Expr[Array[Int]], x: c.Expr[Int]): c.Expr[Unit] = {
  import c.universe._
  val r = reify {
     val $value = x.splice
     val $arr  = ary.splice
     $arr(0)   = $value
     $arr(1)   = $value
     $arr(2)   = $value
  }
  println( showRaw( r.tree ))
  r
}

Which gives something like

val vt = newTermName("$value")
val at = newTermName("$arr")
val ut = newTermName("update")
Block(List(
  ValDef(Modifiers(), vt, TypeTree(), ...),
  ValDef(Modifiers(), at, TypeTree(), ...),
  Apply(Select(Ident(at), ut), List(Literal(Constant(0)), Ident(vt))),
  Apply(Select(Ident(at), ut), List(Literal(Constant(1)), Ident(vt)))),
  Apply(Select(Ident(at), ut), List(Literal(Constant(2)), Ident(vt)))
)
share|improve this answer
1  
Do not use $ on identifiers! They are reserved for the compiler, and reifying already protects you from identifier clash. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 19 '12 at 2:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.